CHM 113 Lab Investigation 4.docx - Investigation 4 How is...

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Investigation 4: How is Lab Equipment Used? Alana Herman, Mariah Walker, James Laxamana, and Robert Davis Ryan Eaton Wednesday 6:20-8:10pm January 25th, 2018 Introduction: The objective of this experiment was to determine the precision (how consistent each of the
results are in terms of each other) and the accuracy (how close the data found is to the relative target value) of various lab equipment. The lab equipment assessed consisted of a burette, beaker, pipette, and a erlenmeyer flask. Each glassware depicted a different degree of significant figures, and it was this value difference that was tested for accuracy and precision. Thus, it was hypothesized that the lab equipment with more specific measurement values would be more accurate and/or precise while the lab equipment with more vague measurement values would be less accurate and/or precise. Materials and Methods: The materials used in this experiment included an electronic scale, distilled water, a burette, a graduated cylinder, an erlenmeyer flask, a 50mL beaker, and a pipette. The burette, beaker, pipette, and erlenmeyer flask were tested in their accuracy and precision by identifying which glasswares’ experimental volumes of water were closest to the theoretical volume. The first step for this experiment was to fill the burette with water. The 50mL beaker was then placed on the electronic scale and zeroed out. Using the burette, 20 mL of water were measured for trials 1 and 2, and 10mL for trial 3. The 20 mL measured in the burette were transferred to the 50 mL beaker to weigh the mass of trial 1 and trial 2. This process was repeated for the third trial except 10 mL were measured in the burette instead of 20mL. To measure the precision and accuracy of the 50 mL beaker, the beaker was filled to 20 mL and weighed on the scale after zeroing out the beaker’s mass. This was repeated for trial 2 and 3, but alternatively 10mL were measured in trial 3. To measure the precision and accuracy of the pipette, the tool was first placed on the electronic scale and zeroed out. After the 50 mL beaker was filled with water, the pipette was used to withdraw 0.5 mL. The filled pipette was then weighed on the scale. This

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