Lab 5.docx - Separation of a Carboxylic Acid a Phenol and a...

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Separation of a Carboxylic Acid, a Phenol, and a Neutral Substance through Multiple Extractions and Reactions Triston Wilson - [email protected] Abstract: The purpose of this experiment was to separate 3 substances in a mixture and determine the percent of recovery of each through a series of reactions and extractions. Also, another point was to assess the purity of the products by discovering the melting point of the substance. Liquid-liquid extractions were used with diethyl ether, sodium bicarbonate, and sodium hydroxide in order to separate the three components. Then HCL was added to each separation in order to regenerate the original non-ionic substances so they could be extracted and weighed to determine the percent recovery and melting point. The melting point of the phenol was 18.6-99.0 degrees celsius, and the melting point of the carboxylic acid was 99.0-107.6 degrees celsius. The percent recovery of the total mixture was 89.9%, and the percent composition of our recovery of phenol, carboxylic acid, and the neutral substance was 50.9%, 2.48%, and 46.6% respectively. The mixture was separated successfully, although the full amount of the crude mixture was not recovered, and the substances were not pure. A better percent recovery could have been achieved through more recrystallization, and if the crystals were allowed to dry more a more accurate melting point could have been achieved. Introduction: This mixture was separated through the use of solvent-solvent extraction. This is a method used to separate compounds based on their relative solubilities in two different immiscible liquids, usually water and an organic solvent. It is an extraction of a substance from one liquid into another liquid phase. The aqueous and organic layers in a solvent-solvent extraction separate from each other and the layer with the lower density will rise to the top. In most reactions the organic layer separates to the bottom and the aqueous rises to the top because organic solvents are generally more dense than water.
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