Lab_9_ - Lab 9: Vegetarian Cooking and Legumes Overview of...

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Lab 9: Vegetarian Cooking and Legumes Overview of Lab 9: 1. Vegetarian Cooking and Legumes Presentation 2. Prepare assigned recipes (note: you may be working in pairs for this lab) 3. Evaluate the sensory properties of each of the products Objectives: The student should be able to: 1. Assess the nutritive value of legumes, nuts and seeds. 2. Know how to combine complementary proteins. 3. Prepare and compare foods made with protein-containing plant foods.
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FOOD SCIENCE PRINCIPLES FOR LEGUMES 1. Legumes, nuts and seeds are good sources of protein and fiber. Legumes are the best protein source of the three classes of plant proteins and also contain carbohydrate. In contrast to most meats, they contain almost no fat and no saturated fat or cholesterol. Nuts and seeds are high in calories due to their high fat content, although they are healthier sources of protein than most meats because the fat is not saturated fat. As is true of legumes, they also contain no cholesterol. Some minerals are found in these foods, but their availability may be limited due to the presence of fiber. 2. Plant proteins are considered poor quality proteins because they lack a sufficient quantity or the proper ratio of one or more of the essential amino acids. The amino acid lacking in a protein is called the limiting amino acid. The quality of a plant protein may be improved if the limiting amino acid is supplied, either as an additive (cereal with milk) or by supplying another plant protein that has the amino acid in abundance (pairing legumes with grains as in beans with rice). This is referred to as “complementing” proteins. In general, legumes are limited in methionine and tryptophan; nuts in lysine and tryptophan and grains and seeds in lysine. 3. An alkaline environment will increase the speed at which dried legumes rehydrate but will destroy thiamin. Thus, adding some baking soda to dried legumes will shorten cooking time, although too much can result in a mushy product. Acids have the opposite effect so ingredients such as tomatoes are best added after the legumes have softened.
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VEGETARIAN AND LEGUME PREPARATION 1. Persian Spinach and Black-eyed Peas (lab manual) 2. Southwestern Black-eyed Peas (lab manual) 3. Bangla Dal with a Hint of Lime (lab manual) 4. Nutseed burgers (lab manual) 5. Red, Gold, Black and Green Chili (lab manual) 6. Caribbean Black Beans (pg. 350) (Follow recipe using dried black beans, but in step 1, simmer over medium-high heat, covered, after bringing beans and water to a boil.) 7. Hummus (lab manual) 8. Bean and Tomato Salad (lab manual) 9. Donna’s Cocoa Bean Brownies (lab manual) 10. Apple Bean Cake (lab manual)
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Apple-Bean Cake (adapted from Lab manual for Brown’s Understanding Food Principles and Preparation ) ¼ cup margarine 2 cups well mashed, canned pinto beans (drained and rinsed) ¼ cup apple juice ½ c whole wheat flour ½ c all-purpose flour 1 tsp cinnamon ½ tsp cloves ¼ tsp nutmeg ¾ cup raisins 1 ½ tsp vanilla 2 eggs ½ c honey
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Lab_9_ - Lab 9: Vegetarian Cooking and Legumes Overview of...

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