IPS6eCh05_1bb

IPS6eCh05_1bb - Sampling Distributions For Counts and...

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Unformatted text preview: Sampling Distributions For Counts and Proportions IPS Chapter 5.1 2009 W. H. Freeman and Company Objectives (IPS Chapter 5.1) Sampling distributions for counts and proportions Binomial distributions for sample counts Binomial distributions in statistical sampling Binomial mean and standard deviation Sample proportions Normal approximation Binomial formulas Reminder: the two types of data Quantitative Something that can be counted or measured and then averaged across individuals in the population (e.g., your height, your age, your IQ score) Categorical Something that falls into one of several categories. What can be counted is the proportion of individuals in each category (e.g., your gender, your hair color, your blood typeA, B, AB, O). How do you figure it out? Ask: What are the n individuals/units in the sample (of size n )? What is being recorded about those n individuals/units? Is that a number ( quantitative) or a statement ( categorical)? Binomial distributions for sample counts Binomial distributions are models for some categorical variables, typically representing the number of successes in a series of n trials. The observations must meet these requirements: The total number of observations n is fixed in advance. Each observation falls into just 1 of 2 categories: success and failure. The outcomes of all n observations are statistically independent. All n observations have the same probability of success, p . We record the next 50 births at a local hospital. Each newborn is either a boy or a girl; each baby is either born on a Sunday or not. We express a binomial distribution for the count X of successes among n observations as a function of the parameters n and p: B ( n,p ). The parameter n is the total number of observations. The parameter p is the probability of success on each observation. The count of successes X can be any whole number between 0 and n . A coin is flipped 10 times. Each outcome is either a head or a tail. The variable X is the number of heads among those 10 flips, our count of successes. On each flip, the probability of success, head, is 0.5. The number X of heads among 10 flips has the binomial distribution B ( n = 10, p = 0.5). Applications for binomial distributions Binomial distributions describe the possible number of times that a particular event will occur in a sequence of observations. They are used when we want to know about the occurrence of an event, not its magnitude. In a clinical trial, a patients condition may improve or not. We study the number of patients who improved, not how much better they feel....
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This note was uploaded on 04/25/2009 for the course ECON 41 taught by Professor Guggenberger during the Winter '07 term at UCLA.

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IPS6eCh05_1bb - Sampling Distributions For Counts and...

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