ARTS 150 1 September 2008c

ARTS 150 1 September 2008c - FourteenthCentury Art in...

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Fourteenth-Century Art in Europe
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Bonaventura Berlinghieri Panel from  St. Francis Altarpiece   (1235) Tempera on wood approx. 5’ x 3’ x 6” San Francesco, Pescia Duccio di Buoninsegna Betrayal of Jesus , detail from the back of the  Maestà  altarpiece (1309-1311) Tempera on wood detail approx. 1’ 10 ½” x 3’ 4” Museo dell’Opera del Duomo, Siena Italo-Byzantine Early Italian Renaissance
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stylized, exaggerated naturalistic, proportional flat, two-dimensional attempts to render 3-D effect within somewhat naturalistic landscape frontal, some 3/4 views some ¾ and full profile views rigid, formal more fluid, less posed  static more dynamic hierarchical interaction within composition lack of body beneath drapery drapery suggests anatomy (see Judas in center of composition) emotionless a little more expressive addresses the viewer incorporates synoptic narrative (more than one episode in a single  panel lack of spatial depth attempts recession in space, but lacks  chiaroscuro   (light and shadow) generous use of gold leaf retains use of gold leaf, but to a lesser extent than Italo- Byzantine paintings Italo-Byzantine             Early Italian Renaissance
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Giotto di Bondone Lamentation  (1305-1306) fresco, 6’ 5” x  6’ Srovegni (Arena) Chapel Padua Giotto’s articulation of  human emotion set a  new standard for  artistic practice in Italy.
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buon fresco ( layer of rough    plaster ) ( preparatory charcoal     sketch ) Some colors, such as ultramarine blue and gold leaf must be added  after the composition dries, in the  fresco secco  process ( final, smooth coat of plaster to which water- based pigments are applied while the plaster is still wet )
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This note was uploaded on 04/26/2009 for the course ARTS 150 taught by Professor Caffey during the Spring '08 term at Texas A&M.

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ARTS 150 1 September 2008c - FourteenthCentury Art in...

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