StatsCh9-1 - Introduction to Hypothesis Testing Kishen...

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Unformatted text preview: Introduction to Hypothesis Testing Kishen Iyengar Nonstatistical Hypothesis Testing A criminal trial is an example of hypothesis testing without the statistics. In a trial a jury must decide between two hypotheses. The null hypothesis is H : The defendant is innocent The alternative hypothesis or research hypothesis is H 1 : The defendant is guilty The jury does not know which hypothesis is true. They must make a decision on the basis of evidence presented. Nonstatistical Hypothesis Testing Decision Truth Innocent Guilty Innocent Correct Error (Type 1) Guilty Error (Type 2) Correct Nonstatistical Hypothesis Testing There are two possible errors. A Type I error occurs when we reject a true null hypothesis. That is, a Type I error ( - Greek letter alpha ) occurs when the jury convicts an innocent person. A Type II error occurs when we dont reject a false null hypothesis. Type II error ( - Greek letter beta ) occurs when a guilty defendant is acquitted. The two probabilities are inversely related. Decreasing one increases the other. Nonstatistical Hypothesis Testing In our judicial system Type I errors are regarded as more serious. We try to avoid convicting innocent people. We are more willing to acquit guilty people....
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StatsCh9-1 - Introduction to Hypothesis Testing Kishen...

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