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exam 2 study guide - Progressive Era: T r iangle Fire...

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Unformatted text preview: Progressive Era: T r iangle Fire (1911)- worst workplace disaster of new York city at the time- Killed 146 garment workers- Led to legislation requiring better factory conditions+ helped spur the growth of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union I ndustrial Workers of the World (IWW, or Wobblies)- The IWW was founded in Chicago in June 1905 at a convention of two hundred sots, anarchists, and radical trade unionists from all over the United States (mainly the Western Federation of Miners) who were opposed to the policies of the American Federation of Labor (AFL- The IWW's goal was to promote worker solidarity in the revolutionary struggle to overthrow the employing class- The IWW was condemned by politicians and the press, who saw them as a threat to the market systems as well as an effort to monopolize labor at a time when efforts to monopolize industries were being fought as anti-market Big Bill Haywood- Haywood was a leader of the Western Federation of Miners (WFM), a founding member and leader of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), and a member of the Executive Committee of the Sot Party of America- Haywood had always been largely Marxist in his political views, and campaigned for Eugene Debs during the 1908 presidential election, traveling by train with Debs around the country Elizabeth Gurley Flynn- labor leader, activist, and feminist who played a leading role in the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW). Flynn was a founding member of the American Civil Liberties Union and a visible proponent of women's rights, birth control, and women's suffrage Lawrence, MA textile strike (1912)- strike of immigrant workers in Lawrence, Massachusetts in 1912 led by the Industrial Workers of the World. Prompted by one mill owner's decision to lower wages when a new law shortening the workweek went into effect in January, the strike spread rapidly through the town, growing to more than twenty thousand workers at nearly every mill within a week. The strike, which lasted more than two months and which defied the assumptions of conservative unions within the American Federation of Labor that immigrant, largely female and ethnically divided workers could not be organized, was successful; a year later, however, the union had largely collapsed and most of the gains achieved by the workers had disappeared. Sot Party (1901)- have explicit connections to the Labour movement and trade unions- one of the heirs to the Sot Party of America of Eugene V. Debs and Norman Thomas Eugene V. Debs - one of the founding members of the International Labor Union and the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), as well as candidate for President of the United States as a member of the Social Democratic Party in 1900, and later as a member of the Sot Party of America in 1904, 1908, 1912, and 1920 Booker T. Washington Atlanta Compromise (1895)- appealed to middle class whites across the South, asking them to give blacks a chance to work and develop separately, while implicitly promising not to...
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exam 2 study guide - Progressive Era: T r iangle Fire...

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