The Independence Movements in British North America and Spanish America.edited.docx

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Surname 1 Student’s Name Professor’s Name Course Date Part A: Comparing the Independence Movements in British North America and Spanish America Introduction Between the late 18th Century and the early 19th Century, the British North America and the Spanish America colonies experienced some revolutionary activities against their mother countries. There is a raft of reasons that propelled the colonists to fight for their freedom in both revolutionary movements. Moreover, both of these revolutions had some striking similarities in many aspects yet differed in others. Nonetheless, both movements resulted in the realization of independence and self-rule from their mother countries. This paper attempts to compare the independence movements in British North America with those in Spanish America and particularly highlight some of the distinct factors that led the Colonials in each empire to break free of their respective mother country. Causes of the Independent Movements One of the underlying reasons for the revolutions in both regions was the fact that there was a sense of dissatisfaction as a result of the discriminatory tendencies of their mother countries. In North America for example, the colonials felt that they were also entitled to all perks of being Englishmen such as being represented by some of their "own" since they even paid taxes to the crown. However, the British government was of the view that the colonies could not have all rights that British citizens enjoyed since they were created for the sole benefit of
Surname 2 the parliament and the crown. This disagreement exacerbated the radical calls for the American Revolution by the colonials citing, among other things, that there would be no taxation without representation.

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