RTF Exam 2 Review - Film History I Classical Hollywood(Ch 7...

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Film History I: Classical Hollywood (Ch 7: pp.189-201) + Schatz, “The Studio System & Conglomerate  Hollywood”  Feature film —longer story films, usually over 1  ½  hours  o D.W. Griffith the first full-length feature film in 1915—“Birth of a Nation” Star system —the film studios’ use of stars’ popularity to promote their movies  o Film studios soon discovered that certain actors and actresses could attract  viewers no matter what the movie was about  o Some became such attractions that their names appeared above the title of  the film on theatre marques Motion Picture   Code —of 1930—self -regulation of sex on screen by the motion  picture industry o Aka Hays Code  o Voluntary content guidelines  o Even without spoken dialogue,  movies in the 1920s shocked audiences  with sexual themes  o The industry decided to impose self-censorship before it became censored  by the government or others o In 1922, the studios created the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors  of America, known as the Hays Office  o Fear that internal censorship bridled the creativity of industry writers,  directors, and actors  Rise and fall of Classical Hollywood & the studio system—pg 195 o Classical Hollywood 1920s-1940s Key to classical Hollywood success: studio system and vertical  integration of the U.S. market  o Vertical integration of the U.S. market Production Distribution Exhibition (theatres) One company does all 3 stages  o Studio system—in Hollywood emphasized key stars as a way to promote  studio films Characteristics and advantages of the studio system o Factory-based, mass-produced system o Contract talent 
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Directors, writers, editors  o Star system  o “house style” geared to star-genre formulas  o Big 8 producer-distributors  Shared one another’s films (and theatres) Loaned out their top talent to one another  Big Five  v.  Little Three o The big 8 producer-distributors Owned most of the crucial first-run theatres Controlled the flow of product through the rest of the nation’s  theatres Shared one another’s films and first-run theatres Locked out significant competition in both the distribution and  exhibition sectors o Big 5 fully integrated studios  MGM Paramount  20 th  Century Fox Warner Bros.  RKO o Little 3 minor studios (no theatres) Universal  Columbia  United Artists  1948 Paramount   Decree o Theatre chain divorcement  o Market reforms o   US v. Paramount Pictures Vertical integration o When companies with the same owner handle different aspects of a  business, such as film production and distribution o
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