Hypoxia Adaptations at Altitude

Hypoxia Adaptations at Altitude - Hypoxia Adaptations 1...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Hypoxia Adaptations Hypoxia Adaptations at Altitude Jessica Burke Kansas University Biological Anthropology 304 Geetha Chitoor 13 March 2009 1
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Hypoxia Adaptations Summary “Lessons in Hypoxic Adaptation from High-Altitude Populations” by Kingman P. Strohl, published in Sleep Breath in 2008, discusses the increase of hemoglobin levels in sea-level natives in response to short-term altitude gain while this increase is not imperative for long-term elevation gain. Strohl (2008) believes genetic adaptation has occurred in high altitude populations to allow for better oxygen transportation and saturation levels. Hypoxia creates the need for humans to better efficiently transport limited amounts of oxygen to survive. Strohl (2008) observes that once a sea level native returns from adapting to high altitude, hemoglobin levels return to pre-hypoxia levels. Hemoglobin levels among high-altitude populations are relatively similar while oxygen saturation rates differ between Andean, Tibetan and Ethiopian high-altitude populations. From this observation, Strohl (2008) infers that these high-altitude populations did not follow the same processes when migrating from sea level to high altitudes; different mechanisms or combination of mechanisms are used (Stanford et al, 2009). Strohl (2008) assesses individual characteristics of high-altitude populations by calculating the variance of heritability and determines whether it is suggestive or influenced by inheritance. By using this 2
Image of page 2
Hypoxia Adaptations method, Strohl (2008) determines that hemoglobin concentration in high-altitude Andean and Tibetan populations are strongly inheritable.
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern