review_Ch9-11

review_Ch9-11 - Chapter 9 Static Equilibrium; Elasticity...

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Chapter 9 Static Equilibrium; Elasticity and Fracture
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Summary of Chapter 9 An object at rest is in equilibrium; the study of such objects is called statics. In order for an object to be in equilibrium, there must be no net force on it along any coordinate, and there must be no net torque around any axis. An object in static equilibrium can be either in stable, unstable, or neutral equilibrium.
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9-1 The Conditions for Equilibrium The first condition for equilibrium is that the forces along each coordinate axis add to zero .
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9-1 The Conditions for Equilibrium The second condition of equilibrium is that there be no torque around any axis; the choice of axis is arbitrary .
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9-2 Solving Statics Problems 1. Choose one object at a time, and make a free- body diagram showing all the forces on it and where they act. 2. Choose a coordinate system and resolve forces into components . 3. Write equilibrium equations for the forces. 4. Choose any axis perpendicular to the plane of the forces and write the torque equilibrium equation. A clever choice here can simplify the problem enormously. 5. Solve .
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9-2 Solving Statics Problems The previous technique may not fully solve all statics problems, but it is a good starting point.
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9-2 Solving Statics Problems If a force in your solution comes out negative (as F A will here), it just means that it’s in the opposite direction from the one you chose. This is trivial to fix, so don’t worry about getting all the signs of the forces right before you start solving.
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9-2 Solving Statics Problems If there is a cable or cord in the problem, it can support forces only along its length. Forces perpendicular to that would cause it to bend.
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9-4 Stability and Balance If, however, the forces tend to move it away from its equilibrium point, it is said to be in unstable equilibrium.
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Chapter 10 Fluids
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Summary of Chapter 10 Phases of matter: solid, liquid, gas. Liquids and gases are called fluids. Density is mass per unit volume. Specific gravity is the ratio of the density of the material to that of water. Pressure is force per unit area. Pressure at a depth h is ρ gh . External pressure applied to a confined fluid is transmitted throughout the fluid.
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Summary of Chapter 10 Atmospheric pressure is measured with a barometer. Gauge pressure is the total pressure minus the atmospheric pressure. An object submerged partly or wholly in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid it displaces. Fluid flow can be laminar or turbulent. The product of the cross-sectional area and the speed is constant for horizontal flow.
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Where the velocity of a fluid is high, the pressure is low, and vice versa. Viscosity is an internal frictional force within
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This note was uploaded on 04/27/2009 for the course PHSX 114 taught by Professor Davis during the Spring '08 term at Kansas.

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review_Ch9-11 - Chapter 9 Static Equilibrium; Elasticity...

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