Foreign%20Policy - Foreign Policy GOVT 2302 Patrick Brandt...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Foreign Policy GOVT 2302 Patrick Brandt
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Players: The Makers and Shapers of Foreign Policy There are three principle governmental actors or institutions that make foreign policy: the President: Via article II powers the bureaucracy: Via implementation and diplomacy the Congress: Via the power of the purse, confirmations, and oversight
Background image of page 2
Formal Powers of President As Commander in Chief, the President of the United States has an unusual amount of influence in foreign policy making. This derives from Article II: Receives ambassadors Repels invasion / uses force as Commander in Chief Make treaties (with Senate consent) Recognize foreign governments
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Related Executive Branch Departments / Agencies Several executive departments and agencies advise the president and Congress on foreign policy and play their own roles in implementing these policies. These include: the Department of State the Department of Defense the Joint Chiefs of Staff the Central Intelligence Agency the National Security Council the Department of Homeland Security
Background image of page 4
Powers of Congress in Foreign Policy Congress makes foreign policy through its power to declare war, its role in making policy and funding programs, and the Senate’s role in ratifying treaties. Important committees are: the Senate’s Foreign Relations and Armed Services Committees the House Senate International Affairs and Armed Services Committees
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Third parties / Citizens Interest groups , ranging from businesses and defense contractors to ethnic interest groups and organized labor, seek to shape American defense, diplomatic, and trade policies. Public opinion , though is generally less consistent and well formed. Public tends to reflect leaders, rather than leaders the public.
Background image of page 6
Media and opinions The media also play important roles in informing the public
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/28/2009 for the course GOVT 2302 taught by Professor Casey,walter during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson.

Page1 / 25

Foreign%20Policy - Foreign Policy GOVT 2302 Patrick Brandt...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online