ps10 - (1 , 0) of radius a n = 1. Consider the cases a...

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18.02 Problem Set 10 Due Thursday 11/13/08, 12:45 pm in 2-106. Part A (10 points) Hand in the underlined problems only; the others are for more practice. Lecture 28. Thu Nov. 6 Triple integrals in rectangular and cylindrical coordinates. Read: 12.8 to p. 841; Notes I.3; 14.6 (esp. Examples 1, 2, 3); 14.7 pp. 988–989. Work: 12.8/ 5, 23; 14.6/ 41; 14.7/ 9, 19; 5A/ 1, 2ab cd , 3, 4 , 5 , 6, 7. Lecture 29. Fri Nov. 7 Spherical coordinates. Gravitational attraction. Read: Notes I.4, CV.4, G; 14.7 pp. 990–992. Work: 12.8/ 9, 11, 15, 27, 55 ; 5B/ 1abc , 2 , 3 , 4ab c; 5C/ 2 , 3, 4. Part B (16 points) Directions: Attempt to solve each part of each problem yourself. If you collaborate, solutions must be written up independently. It is illegal to consult materials from previous semesters. With each problem is the day it can be done. Write the names of all the people you consulted or with whom you collaborated and the resources you used. Problem 1. (immediately, 4 points) Find the ±ux of the vector ²eld v F = x r 2 ˆ ı + y r 2 ˆ outwards through any circle centered at
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Unformatted text preview: (1 , 0) of radius a n = 1. Consider the cases a > 1 and a < 1 separately. Explain your answers with diagrams. Optional: use the applet on the course web page to get a better understanding of what happens when a changes from a value lower than 1 to a value greater than 1. Problem 2. (Thursday, 4 points) Do 14.6/39. (Suggestion: use the order dxdy dz . The numerical answer is in the back of the text. Feel free to check your work using it.) Problem 3. (Friday, 4 points) The average value of f ( x,y,z ) over a region D in space is 1 V ( D ) iii D f ( x,y,z ) dV, V ( D ) = volume of D Set up the integral both in cylindrical and spherical coordinates for the average distance from a point in the solid sphere of radius a to a point on the surface, and evaluate both integrals. Put the point on the surface at the origin and make it the South Pole of the sphere. Problem 4. (Friday, 4 points) Notes 5C/5....
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This note was uploaded on 04/28/2009 for the course MATH 18.02 taught by Professor Auroux during the Fall '08 term at MIT.

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