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research proposal - The Use of 1 Running head STEM CELLS IN...

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The Use of 1 Running head: STEM CELLS IN THE TREATMENT OF MUTLIPLE SCLEROSIS The Use of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Treating Multiple Sclerosis Julianna Bloom Pepperdine University November 24, 2008
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The Use of 2 Abstract Recently there have been advances in the safety and effectiveness of the use of adult bone marrow stem cells also called mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), in animals. Thus, this study is designed to treat humans with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) in order to battle the degeneration of the myelin sheath in the nerves of the Central Nervous System (CNS). The MSC will be injected into 35 patients, who have been diagnosed with progressive MS; the other 35 participants will receive a placebo. The effects will be assessed over a six month period. The hypothesis is that there will be an increase in the remyelination of the cells in the CNS and thus, show objective improvements on the Expanded Disability Status Scale.
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The Use of 3 The Use of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Treating Multiple Sclerosis Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a degenerative disorder of the Central Nervous System (CNS). There is a break down of the myelin sheath over the axons of the nerves that relay information from the spinal cord to the brain (Morris, 2004). MS becomes difficult to diagnose because of its variety of symptoms. There are usually changes in vision, muscle weakness, abnormal sensations in the limbs, and some cognitive and psychological impairment or changes (“Multiple Sclerosis,” 1998). The changes in vision can cause complete or partial loss of sight and therefore impact daily activities. . Also, muscular weakness leads to a loss of control of those muscles when the nerves are no longer able to send out signals. They will no longer be able to perceive the world in the same way because they do not have their vision and their muscular control is slowly deteriorating At this later stage in the disease, a patient will progressively lose the ability to move and function. There have been many studies looking at alternative therapies for patients with Multiple Sclerosis. There are some drugs that can slow the progression of the disease but none have gone on to be proven completely effective. One drug, natalizumab, was developed to reduce inflammatory features of the disease (Ropper, 2006). But, the study conducted by Ropper in 2006 states that no drugs, including natalizumab, are completely effective once the progressive stage of MS begins. Studies have looked at drugs such as teriflunomide and rituximab to decrease the relapse rates and brain lesions as seen by an MRI (Linker, Kieseier, & Gold, 2008). These studies are very recent but have lacked to control for variables and dangerous side effects. Many of these studies involving drugs
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The Use of 4 do not have enough concrete evidence to receive approval by the FDA or have not seen significant, replicable effects. Cognitive deficits are common in MS and can include problems in complex
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research proposal - The Use of 1 Running head STEM CELLS IN...

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