toyota - TOYOTA PRODUCTION SYSTEM "ONE - BY - ONE...

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TOYOTA PRODUCTION SYSTEM “ONE - BY - ONE CONFIRMATION” University of Kentucky Lean Manufacturing Conference May 14-16, 1997 Mr. Kitano – Keynote Address May 15, 1997 ' Toyota Motor Manufacturing, 1997 Available at http://www.MfgEng.com with permission of TMM
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INTRODUCTION OF THEME: TPS, ONE-BY-ONE CONFIRMA TION Often professionals say that they want to learn about TPS because they want to attain a specific result. They say: “We want reduced labor and material costs,” or “We want increased productivity,” or “We want higher quality,” or “We want better employee motivation.” Many professionals have been lead to believe that transplanting the “mysterious secrets” of TPS into their American businesses will solve all of the problems their companies are facing. So, today, I am going to tell you the “secret” of TPS, from my experience. This secret can be applied to: Any industry Any work-site situation Any culture The “mysterious secret” of TPS is common sense. You have probably heard this “mysterious secret” from your parents and teachers, since the time you were born. It is the basic principle of: “Do it right the first time!” Now, you know everything! But, seriously, let me explain a little further, how “to do it right the first time.” It is through “ONE-BY-ONE CONFIRMATION:” From the smallest detail of a process To the most complex scope of your company Now, you know the whole secret! It is just common sense! How did Toyota discover this mysterious common sense secret of ONE-BY-ONE CONFIRMATION? In 1934, in the early days of the development of Toyota’s first vehicle, Kiichiro Toyoda decided to duplicate the Chevrolet six-cylinder engine. Under the direction of 2 ' Toyota Motor Manufacturing, 1997 Available at http://www.MfgEng.com with permission of TMM
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Kiichiro Toyoda, the Toyota group worked from the experience they had in simple cast- ings for the loom business. However, the intricate coring for the intake and exhaust chambers was beyond their experience. They quickly studied other foreign and domestic systems to develop suitable cores, and modeled their designs after those they had studied. Kiichiro’s group rationalized that by using these best practices of foreign and domestic methods, they would be able to sustain consistency. Eventually, the casting process began to improve, and many castings (maybe 300) were produced. The machinists anxiously awaited to process these castings on the newly acquired equipment. They proceeded to immediately process and stockpile the completed, shiny machined heads as evidence of their skill and fine equipment. However, the first engines made with these heads failed to achieve the expected performance. Kiichiro had not verified, from the beginning, if the actual production castings met the required design shape to produce the horsepower target. This created a big concern for Kiichiro.
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This note was uploaded on 04/29/2009 for the course CBS 456765 taught by Professor Paul during the Three '09 term at Curtin.

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toyota - TOYOTA PRODUCTION SYSTEM "ONE - BY - ONE...

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