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ars300 unit 3 - Unit 3 Popular Culture in Art I What is...

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Unit 3 : Popular Culture in Art I. What is Popular Culture Lecture In Unit III and Unit IV, we turn our attention to art and popular culture in order to consider the relevance of art in our everyday lives. We will apply what we have learned about the purposes, meanings and formal properties of art to the images that comprise our visual experience of the world, from easel paintings to advertisements, from television to tattooing. As we shall see, art and popular culture enjoy a symbiotic relationship, influencing and rejuvenating one another in complex ways. In this unit, we will focus on how artists have responded to popular culture since the late nineteenth century. In the next unit, we will address the spaces of popular culture as sites where art is practiced, reformulated and redefined. The line between art and popular culture has become increasingly blurred, and the distinctions are often contested. This section focuses on definitions of popular culture and some of the implications of the term. Reading Assignment Pedersen: “Introduction” Study Images, Terms and Questions Images: Magritte, Treachery of Images , 1928 Terms: popular culture- refers to those entertainments and culture products that pervade our everydat life, including: mass media, collectibles, comics, internet websites, video games, fashion, pop music, popular novels, graffiti, and other artifacts made or used by ordinary people. Marshal McLuhan- an important theorist for the study of popular culture and technology who suggests that new media and technologies create new environments. “the medium is the message” Walter Benjamin- theorist that points out the importance of medium in our interpretation of images in popular culture. “aura of originality is lost”
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Semiotics- study of symbols and signs Study Questions: What is popular culture? How does it differ from art, if at all? -popular culture generally refers to those entertainments and culture products that pervade our everyday life. It includes mass media (tv, music, magazines, advertising, billboards), collectibles, comics, internet websites, video games, fashion, pop music, popular novels, graffiti, and other artifacts made or used by ordinary people. It also sometimes refers to folk art forms and vernacular or "peoples" art that is not created for or within the parameters of the official art world. -Art occupied a priveleged space as part of elite Culture, elevated above the everyday and reserved for the purportedly higher senses of the aristocracy. Pop Art referred to commercial products and entertainment appreciated by the lower and middle classes. The terms incorporated value judgments and played an important role in marking class differences (comparison chart on page 2) What do we gain from the blurring of “high” and “low” art? What do we lose?
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