Lecture 9 - Pediatric Vaccines

Lecture 9 - Pediatric Vaccines - Pediatric Vaccines Edwin...

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EVO Pediatric Vaccines Edwin Oaks, Ph.D. George Mason University Vaccines BIOL 420 Section 2
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EVO
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EVO
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EVO
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EVO Pediatric Vaccines Measles, mumps, rubella Hib ( Hemophilus influenzae ) HepB (hepatitis B) Varicella DPT (diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus) see lecture 6 Inactivated polio (see lecture 8) Pneumococcal (see lecture 6) Influenza virus Hepatitis A
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EVO Measles video Diseases of Wind 08
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EVO Measles Measles is an acute viral disease Highly contagious First described in the 7th century Virus first isolated in 1954 In monkey kidney tissue culture In pre-vaccine era - almost all children were infected with measles virus (by age 15 - everyone had antibodies) Common and often fatal in developing countries Results in life-long immunity First live-attenuated measles vaccine in U.S. - 1963
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EVO Measles Virus Paramyxovirus (genus Morbillivirus) 100-200 nm in diameter, enveloped Single stranded (- sense) RNA genome 2 envelope proteins are important in pathogenesis F (fusion) protein Allows fusion of virus and host cell membranes Allows penetration, also hemolysis H (hemagglutinin) protein Allows attachment or adherence to host cells Located on surface of virion Only one antigenic type of measles virus Virus is rapidly inactivated by heat & light
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EVO Measles Virus An electron micrograph Of measles virus Provided by Dr. C. Hickman, CDC
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EVO Measles Virus Pathogenesis Causes a systemic infection Primary site is respiratory epithelium of nasopharynx and regional lymph nodes Next viremia ( 2-3 days after exposure ) Spread to reticuloendothelial system Next second viremia Shed from nasopharynx Incubation period is 10 to 12 days Rash appears on about day 14 Prodrome Increase in fever to 103 o F or higher Cough, coryza, conjunctivitis Koplik spots (rash present on mucous membranes)
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EVO 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 30 60 90 Rash onset
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This note was uploaded on 04/29/2009 for the course BIOL 420 taught by Professor Edwardsoaks during the Fall '08 term at George Mason.

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Lecture 9 - Pediatric Vaccines - Pediatric Vaccines Edwin...

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