Lecture 10 - Vaccines for Adults

Lecture 10 - Vaccines for Adults - VACCINES for ADULTS...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–15. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
EVO VACCINES for ADULTS Edwin Oaks, Ph.D. George Mason University Vaccines BIOL 420 Section 2
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
EVO Adult Vaccines Meningococcus Influenza Papilloma virus Hepatitis A
Background image of page 2
EVO
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
EVO
Background image of page 4
EVO HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
EVO Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) 10 million cases of cancer each year in world 15% attributed to infectious agents HPV causes 30% of these cancer cases 5% of all cancers Hepatitis B and C Helicobacter pylori HPV infects stratified squamous epithelia of skin and mucous membranes Causes benign lesions Some progress to invasive cancer Sexually transmitted disease
Background image of page 6
EVO Burden of Disease due to HPV In developed world, most cost associated with detection and treatment of pre-malignant disease PAP smears Treatment Cost in US is $3 billion/yr Lifetime risk of cervical cancer without screening is 2 to 4%!
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
EVO Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Member of Papovavirus family HPV are small , non-enveloped viruses Circular genome, double-stranded DNA 2 structural proteins L1 and L2 - form capsid E1 and E2 (early proteins) responsible for virus replication and transcription E4 aids in virus release from cells E6 and E7 - main transforming proteins Cutaneous disease Mucosal disease
Background image of page 8
EVO From Jung J Microbiol 42:255, 2004
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
EVO Pathogenesis of HPV HPV infects basal layer cells Viral replication only occurs in fully differentiated cells Avoids immune system of host Most women infected with HPV spontaneously resolve infection in less than 2 yrs. If not cleared, infection persists for years and may cause more severe disease and ultimately cancer In high risk HPV types, the E6 and E7 proteins cause immortalization (transformation) of the epithelial cells and may initiate the oncogenic process.
Background image of page 10
EVO Papilloma virus life cycle From Lowy J Clin Invest 116:1167, 2006
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
EVO Progression from a benign cervical lesion to invasive cervical cancer. HSIL, high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion; LSIL, low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion; CIN, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia)
Background image of page 12
EVO Figure 2 Progression from a benign cervical lesion to invasive cervical cancer. Infection by oncogenic HPV types, especially HPV16, may directly cause a benign condylomatous lesion, low grade dysplasia, or sometimes even an early high-grade lesion. Carcinoma in situ rarely occurs until several years after infection. It results from the combined effects of HPV genes, particularly those encoding E6 and E7, which are the 2 viral oncoproteins that are preferentially retained and expressed in cervical cancers; integration of the viral DNA into the host DNA; and a series of genetic and epigenetic changes in cellular genes. HSIL, highgrade squamous intraepithelial lesion; LSIL, low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion.
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
EVO Relationship among incidences of cervical HPV infection, precancer, and cancer.
Background image of page 14
Image of page 15
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 65

Lecture 10 - Vaccines for Adults - VACCINES for ADULTS...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 15. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online