Lecture 12 C - Economics of Vaccines

Lecture 12 C- - ECONOMICS OF VACCINES Edwin Oaks Ph.D George Mason University Fall 2008 EVO INTRODUCTION Of all high-priority healthcare

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EVO ECONOMICS OF VACCINES Edwin Oaks, Ph.D. George Mason University Fall 2008
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EVO INTRODUCTION Of all high-priority healthcare interventions, immunization is one on the most important. Childhood vaccines against polio, measles, DTP are very good uses of funds available for healthcare These vaccines are highly effective and inexpensive for preventing serious diseases that would be costly to treat Very high benefit for low cost What about new vaccines? Made by more expensive procedures Sometimes targeted at less prevalent or severe diseases Does it make economic sense to introduce the new vaccines??
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EVO Cost-effectiveness Analysis (CEA) CEA is used to inform or rationalize decisions about the use of healthcare resources Is it cheaper to save a life with one type of healthcare intervention as compared to another? Goal is to save the maximum number of lives for the least cost
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EVO Cost-effectiveness Analysis (CEA) Compares two or more health care strategies that have a common objective and are competing for common resources Measures net cost of delivery minus the cost saved by vaccination to a desired health outcome such as the reduction of illness or death from the vaccine preventable disease Calculate a ratio Cost/measurable health outcome The measurable health outcome is usually expressed in terms of life-years gained or other measures reflecting decreased death and morbidity
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EVO Cost-effectiveness Analysis (CEA) Higher cost/measurable health outcome ratios reflect a lower cost effectiveness. The cost effectiveness of two vaccines are:
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This note was uploaded on 04/29/2009 for the course BIOL 420 taught by Professor Edwardsoaks during the Fall '08 term at George Mason.

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Lecture 12 C- - ECONOMICS OF VACCINES Edwin Oaks Ph.D George Mason University Fall 2008 EVO INTRODUCTION Of all high-priority healthcare

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