FungiFall2008 - November 4 2008 Science Headline Fungi...

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November 4, 2008 Science Headline “Fungi”
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Obesity blamed for doubling rate of diabetes cases USA Today November 3, 2008 ATLANTA (AP) — The nation's obesity epidemic is exacting a heavy toll: The rate of new diabetes cases nearly doubled in the United States in the past 10 years , the government said Thursday. The highest rates were in the South, according to the first state-by-state review of new diagnoses. The worst was in West Virginia, where about 13 in 1,000 adults were diagnosed with the disease in 2005-07. The lowest was in Minnesota, where the rate was 5 in 1,000. Roughly 90% of cases are Type 2 diabetes , the form linked to obesity .
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The findings agree with trends seen in obesity and lack of exercise — two health measures where Southern states also rank at the bottom . Type 2 diabetics do not produce or use insulin, a hormone needed to convert sugar into energy. The illness can cause sugar to build up in the body , leading to complications such as heart disease , blindness , kidney failure and poor circulation that leads to foot amputations.
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Is setting clock back good for your heart? By Karen Kaplan Los Angeles Times October 30, 2008 Turning your clock back one hour Sunday for the end of daylight-saving time could do your heart some good . Researchers have found a 5 percent drop in heart-attack deaths and hospitalizations the day after clocks are reset each year to standard time , according to a study in the new issue of The New England Journal of Medicine. The Swedish researchers also found that switching to daylight-saving time in the spring appears to increase the risk of heart attacks .
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The risk also rises on holidays and anniversaries, although no one knows why. The problem is probably sleep . Scientists have known that sleep deprivation is bad for the heart …-- but they didn't realize one hour could have a measurable effect. Sleep can affect the heart through changes in blood pressure , inflammation , blood clotting , blood sugar , cholesterol and blood vessels , said Dr. Lori Mosca, director of preventive cardiology at New York-Presbyterian Hospital.
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This note was uploaded on 04/29/2009 for the course HB 265 taught by Professor Jaemincha during the Spring '09 term at Michigan State University.

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FungiFall2008 - November 4 2008 Science Headline Fungi...

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