3-5 - III.Max Weber a. Class, Status, and Party b....

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Social Stratification and Inequality I. What is Stratification and Inequality? a. Social Inequality is a hierarchy of statuses and rules that enable some people to have more than others b. Social Stratification is a structured ranking process by which inequality in prestige, esteem, power, resources, and opportunity are structured over time in a given society. II. Karl Marx and Social Inequality a. Revolves around the means of production—bourgeoisie vs. proletariat i. Each age is characterized by different means of production: slavery, feudalism, mercantilism, capitalism, and the communism ii. Conflict between these two classes in every age.
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Unformatted text preview: III.Max Weber a. Class, Status, and Party b. ContemporaryOccupation and Education The lower the social class that youre in, the higher the probability you will experience whats considered negative in society. Consensus Tischler Scimecca % U.U. (.5) U. (1) U.U. (.5) L.U. (1) U.M. (10-15) L.U. (1) U.M. (10-15) L.M. (25-35) U.M. (7-9) L.M. (25-35) W.C. (25-30) M.M. (9-10) W.C. (30-35) L.C. (15-20) L.M. (25) L.C. (15-20) W.C. (30) L.C. (25) Upper Class is old money that has been in a family for more than one generation...
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This note was uploaded on 04/29/2009 for the course SOCI 101 taught by Professor Rosenblaum during the Spring '08 term at George Mason.

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3-5 - III.Max Weber a. Class, Status, and Party b....

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