Final Lab - Enzyme Activity Lab Partners Vee Methavarayuth Katherine Ky Rowena Gasmen Shabana Shah Carmela Fister Jennifer Tai G00398931 Instructor

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Enzyme Activity Lab Partners: Vee Methavarayuth, Katherine Ky, Rowena Gasmen, Shabana Shah & Carmela Fister Jennifer Tai G00398931 Instructor: Vincent Hermoso June 17, 2008
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Introduction: Enzymes are organic catalysts that are able to speed up chemical reactions without being consumed by the reactions. The presence of enzymes is the reason why many chemical transformations do not take place at an extremely slow rate. They are entities that are reusable. "A catalyst is a chemical agent that speeds up a reaction without being consumed by the reaction; an enzyme is a catalytic protein (Campbell and Reece).” Most of these organic catalysts are proteins that posses a specific and unique three- dimensional structure that is critical to its function. “Enzymes possess active sites where the actual chemical transformations occur. Substrates are chemicals that undergo chemical change and which fit into the active site (Fox and Christensen).” The enzymes and substrates are all very specific in each functions and reactions. With the enzymes not being consumed within a reaction, it allows the enzyme to "be reused repeatedly on the same small molecules to build a long chain of repeating subunits" (J.R. Wanamaker). The enzyme that we used in our experiment is amylase. Amylase is one of the predominant enzymes found in germinating seeds. It catalyzes the degradation of starch to maltose which is then subsequently degraded by maltase to glucose. These experiments that we performed are used for the understanding of the relation between the enzyme of Amylase and its substrate concentrations in terms of producing a product. In this particular experiment – we used Porcine Amylose – and we also want to understand how the pH of the reaction system can alter the efficiency of the Porcine Amylose, and to understand how the temperature of the reaction system can alter the efficiency of Porcine Amylose. Hypothesis: Experiment B : We hypothesized that as time increases, all the substrates will eventually decrease, following the manual's test that "as absorbance decreases, this indicates that starch concentration is decreased." Experiment C: We hypothesized that as time increases, the absorbance will also decrease from it’s initial measurement; because as time increases, the activity of the porcine amylase under various pH levels will decrease. Experiment D: We hypothesized that in various temperatures – as time increases, absorbance will also decrease, following the manual’s test that “as Absorbance decreases, this indicates that starch concentration is decreasing”.
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Materials: The materials that we used in each of the experiments are: Experiment B : Flasks, pipettes, vortexer, spectrophotometer, cuvette, Lugol’s iodine, starch solution, water. First, we measured 28 mls of enzyme, and diluted the
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This note was uploaded on 04/29/2009 for the course BIOL 213 taught by Professor Dalmet during the Spring '07 term at George Mason.

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Final Lab - Enzyme Activity Lab Partners Vee Methavarayuth Katherine Ky Rowena Gasmen Shabana Shah Carmela Fister Jennifer Tai G00398931 Instructor

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