Paper1 - The Story of an Hour/Critical Analysis Kate...

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“The Story of an Hour” /Critical Analysis/ Kate Chopin’s “The Story of an Hour” is sad and ironic. It is a story about a tragedy and happiness, about death and life, about oppression and freedom. The word "story" in the title refers to that of Louise's life. An article states: “She lived in the true sense of the word, with the will and freedom to live for only one hour.” 1 The major elements that can be found throughout the whole story are irony and symbols of freedom, vitality, comfort, and wellness. Mrs. Louis Mallard, the main character, has a heart disease and her relatives try to prevent her from shocks and unpleasant emotions, but the dramatic irony about her death is revealed in the end of the story. Another example of irony is the reaction of Louise when she learns about the death of her husband, Brently. The author says that she does "not hear the story as many women have heard the same." After she hears the bad news she isolates herself in her room. The reader supposes that she will start crying, breaking objects, and beating the furniture of anger and grief, but instead she sinks in a “comfortable, roomy armchair”. The description of the chair creates an odd sense of coziness and wellness. One could imagine that the “horrible” news will put an end to her life, but ironically she feels liberated. Now time has come for her to get rid of the mental and “physical exhaustion”. She has been confined in a small space; most of the story takes place in her room symbolizing a
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Paper1 - The Story of an Hour/Critical Analysis Kate...

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