Chapter 3 - Financial Analysis Chapter 3 Integrated Case...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Financial Analysis Chapter 3
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Integrated Case D’Leon Part I of this case, presented in Section 3, discussed the situation that D’Leon  Inc., a regional snack foods producer, was in after a 1994 expansion program.   Like Borden, Inc., D’Leon had increased plant capacity and undertaken a major  marketing campaign in an attempt to “go national.”  Thus far, sales have not   been up to the forecasted level, costs have been higher than were projected, and  a large loss occurred in 1994 rather than the expected profit.  Unlike Borden,  D’Leon does not have much underlying financial strength, so its managers,  directors, and investors are concerned about the firm’s survival.   Donna Jamison was brought in as assistant to Fred Camp, D’Leon’s chairman,  who had the task of getting the company back into a sound financial position.   D’Leon’s 1993 and 1994 balance sheets and income statements, together with  projections for 1995, are given in Tables C3-1 and C3-2.  In addition, Table C3-3  gives the company’s 1993 and 1994   
Background image of page 2
financial ratios, together with industry average data.  The 1995 projected  financial statement data represent Jamison’s and Campo’s best guess for  1995 results, assuming that some new financing is arranged to get the  company “over the hump.” Jamison examined monthly data for 1994 (not given in the case), and she  detected an improving pattern during the year.  Monthly sales were rising,  costs were falling, and large losses in the early months had turned to a  small profit by December.  Thus, the annual data look somewhat worse  than final monthly data.  Also, it appears to be taking longer for the  advertising program to get the message across, for the new sales offices  to generate sales, and for the new manufacturing facilities to operate  efficiently.  In other words, the lags between spending money and deriving  benefits were longer than D’Leon’s managers had anticipated.  For these  reasons, Jamison and Campo see hope for the company - provided it can  survive the short run.   Jamison must prepare an analysis of where the company is now, what it  must do to regain its financial health and what   
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Financial Statements Balance Sheet 1995E 1994 1993 Assets     Cash $     85,632 $       7,282 $     57,600 Accounts Receivable      878,000      632,160      351,200 Inventories    1,716,480    1,287,360       715,200      Total current assets $2,680,112   1,926,802   1,124,000 Gross fixed assets $1,197,160   1,202,950      491,000 Less accumulated  depreciation       380,000
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 05/01/2009 for the course FINC 106 taught by Professor Dr.nehale during the Spring '09 term at Baptist College of Health Sciences.

Page1 / 51

Chapter 3 - Financial Analysis Chapter 3 Integrated Case...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online