Ch1. Introduction to Financial Management

Ch1. Introduction to Financial Management - Introduction to...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Introduction to Financial Management This chapter has introduced you to some of the basic ideas in business finance. In it, we saw  that:  1. Business finance has three main areas of concern:  a. Capital budgeting. What long-term investments should the firm take?  b. Capital structure. Where will the firm get the long-term financing to pay for its  investments? In other words, what mixture of debt and equity should we use  to fund our operations?  c. Working capital management. How should the firm manage its everyday  financial activities?  2. The goal of financial management in a for-profit business is to make decisions that  increase the value of the stock, or, more generally, increase the market value of the  equity.  3. The corporate form of organization is superior to other forms when it comes to raising  money and transferring ownership interests, but it has the significant disadvantage of  double taxation.  4. There is the possibility of conflicts between stockholders and management in a large  corporation. We called these conflicts agency problems and discussed how they  might be controlled and reduced. Of the topics we’ve discussed thus far, the most  important is the goal of financial management. Throughout the text, we will be  analyzing many different financial decisions, but we always ask the same question:  How does the decision under consideration affect the value of the equity in the firm? 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Financial Statements, Taxes, and Cash Flow This chapter has introduced you to some of the basics of financial statements, taxes, and  cash flow. In it we saw that:  1. The book values on an accounting balance sheet can be very different from market  values. The goal of financial management is to maximize the market value of the  stock, not its book value.  2. Net income as it is computed on the income statement is not cash flow. A primary  reason is that depreciation, a noncash expense, is deducted when net income is  computed.  3. Marginal and average tax rates can be different, and it is the marginal tax rate that is  relevant for most financial decisions.  4. The marginal tax rate paid by the corporations with the largest incomes is 35 percent.  5. There is a cash flow identity much like the balance sheet identity. It says that cash  flow from assets equals cash flow to creditors and stockholders. The calculation of  cash flow from financial statements isn’t difficult. Care must be taken in handling  noncash expenses, such as depreciation, and in not confusing operating costs with  financing costs. Most of all, it is important not to confuse book values with market  values and accounting income with cash flow. 
Background image of page 2
Ch.3
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 05/01/2009 for the course FINC 106 taught by Professor Dr.nehale during the Spring '09 term at Baptist College of Health Sciences.

Page1 / 20

Ch1. Introduction to Financial Management - Introduction to...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online