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SlidesApr22 - Detection of Gallbladder stones Gallstones...

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Detection of Gallbladder stones Hard stones that form in the gallbladder (usually from condensed cholesterol) that can cause intense pain. The stone has a high density and is hard (not very elastic). Gallstones visible inside a surgically removed and sectioned gallbladder. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gallstone Model as a rigid immovable object that the ultrasound wave hits at the end in our chain of springs. One way: fix x(N)=0 in our computer program. Detecting a cancerous tumor (or any other differing tissue type) with ultrasound A simple model: Can modify our computer program to calculate this. When a ultrasound wave passes from one tissue type to another type, in general the wave may be partly reflected and partly transmitted. Sound waves traveling thru air Biomedical relevance: physiology of voice and hearing What is air? A gas (nitrogen, oxygen, etc. molecules bouncing around) Puzzle: how can waves propagate thru this material The molecules are NOT connected like the mass-springs? Relevant properties of air (gasses)
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This note was uploaded on 05/02/2009 for the course PHYS PHYS 1C taught by Professor F during the Spring '00 term at UCSD.

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SlidesApr22 - Detection of Gallbladder stones Gallstones...

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