Lecture_2___pumps - Lecture 2 Fluid transport systems:...

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1 Lecture 2 Fluid transport systems: Pumps Carmen I. Moraru Cornell University Pumps - Required to “push” fluids through pipelines, valve systems, heat exchangers, filters and other equipment - Type and size of pump selected depending on: -F l o w r a t e - Product to be pumped (sensitive, corrosive, etc.) - Viscosity and density of product - Temperature and pressure in the system - Pump material - Typical pumps used in the dairy industry: - Centrifugal pumps - Liquid-ring pumps - Positive displacement pumps
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2 Sanitary pumps selection decision tree Product Viscous? η >500cps Contains particles? Shear sensitive? High pressure Low flow? Accurate, low flow? Centrifugal pump Positive displacement pump Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No No No No Centrifugal pumps - Mainly used for low-viscosity products - Cannot handle heavily-aerated liquids 1 - Discharge 2 - Shaft seal 3 - Suction line 7 - Motor shaft 8 - Motor 9 - Stainless steel shroud & sound insulation 4 - Impeller 5 - Casing 6 - Back plate
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3 Centrifugal pump charts Review your Food Engineering notes! How do centrifugal pumps work? Centrifugal pumps convert the electric energy of a motor first into velocity or kinetic energy and then into pressure energy of the pumped fluid. - Conversion of electric energy into kinetic energy is caused by the impeller. - The bigger the impeller and the faster it rotates, the higher the velocity of the pumped liquid and the greater its kinetic energy.
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4 Conversion of kinetic energy to pressure energy - The kinetic energy of the liquid coming out of the impeller is harnessed by
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This note was uploaded on 05/02/2009 for the course FDSC 4250 taught by Professor Moraru during the Spring '09 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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Lecture_2___pumps - Lecture 2 Fluid transport systems:...

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