Lecture_7___milk_homogenization - Homogenization of Milk...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 Homogenization of Milk Fat Carmen I. Moraru Cornell University Homogenization - Patented by Auguste Gaulin in 1899 - It is a hydrodynamic process that causes disruption of native fat globules and formation of much smaller and homogeneous globules, surrounded by a newly formed membrane. - Reduces milk fat globule size from about 3.5 μm in diameter to below 1 μm. homogenization: average size 8 μ m homogenization: average size 1 μ m
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 Why is it used? - Prevents segregation of fat (creaming) in milk and other fluid dairy products - Increases stability to partial coalescence of fat globules. Coalescence takes place especially in the cream layer, which forms very slowly in homogenized milk. - Enhances the texture of certain dairy foods. Formation of homogenization clusters leads to increased viscosity of homogenized cream, yogurt, etc. - Can be used as a step in recombining milk products, after initial emulsification. How do homogenizers work? Homogenizers are high pressure pumps that force the liquid (milk) through a narrow opening – the homogenizing valve The homogenizing valve Photo : TetraPak Dairy Processing Handbook, 2003
Background image of page 2
3 Homogenizer types Single-stage homogenizers and Two-stage homogenizers In both single-stage and two-stage homogenizers, the entire homogenization pressure (p 1 ) is used in the first stage. In single stage homogenization, the back pressure (p 2 ) is created by the process. In two-stage homogenization the back pressure is created by the second stage. Best results are obtained for p 2 / p 1 0.2. The second stage reduces noise and vibrations in the outlet pipe. Single-stage homogenization - used for products with high fat content
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 05/02/2009 for the course FDSC 4250 taught by Professor Moraru during the Spring '09 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

Page1 / 8

Lecture_7___milk_homogenization - Homogenization of Milk...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online