FST+160+Functional+Foods+C+Hasler

FST+160+Functional+Foods+C+Hasler - Functional Foods in...

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Unformatted text preview: Functional Foods in Health and Wellness Clare M. Hasler, Ph.D., M.B.A. February 18, 2009 FST 160 cmhasler@ucdavis.edu www.rmi.ucdavis.edu "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food" Hippocrates The Father of Medicine 460 BC 377 BC All foods are functional!! "Foods and food components that provide a health benefit beyond basic nutrition...necessary for normal maintenance, growth, and development, and/or other biologically active components that impart health benefits or desirable physiological effects." http://members.ift.org/IFT/Research/IFTExpertReports/functionalfoods_report.htm March 2005 "...functional foods, including whole foods and fortified, enriched, or enhanced foods, have a potentially beneficial effect on health when consumed as part of a varied diet on a regular basis, at effective levels..." Position Paper on Functional Foods Journal American Dietetic Association, May 2004 Consumption of Fruit & Vegetables and Relative Risk of Cancer Functional Food Drivers Aging population Chronic disease epidemic Rising health care costs HealthHealth-focused consumers Advances in technology Changing regulations Business opportunity Research linking diet to health and wellness Functional Food Drivers Aging population Chronic disease epidemic Rising health care costs HealthHealth-focused consumers Advances in technology Changing regulations Business opportunity Research linking diet to health and wellness The population over age 85 will grow the fastest over the next 50 years Functional Food Drivers Aging population Chronic disease epidemic Rising health care costs HealthHealth-focused consumers Advances in technology Changing regulations Business opportunity Research linking diet to health and wellness Prevention of Chronic Disease Prevention of Nutrient Deficiency Diseases Chronic disease is the major cause of death and disability worldwide Leading Causes of Death in U.S. (%) 1900 1997 Functional Food Drivers Aging population Chronic disease epidemic Rising health care costs HealthHealth-focused consumers Advances in technology Changing regulations Business opportunity Research linking diet to health and wellness Total Health Expenditures as a Share of GDP (2003) Functional Food Drivers Aging population Chronic disease epidemic Rising health care costs HealthHealth-focused consumers Advances in technology Changing regulations Business opportunity Research linking diet to health and wellness " Food Technology, April 2008 A top 10 global food trend (Sloan, April 2005) Shoppers see food as a solution to present and pending health problems (IFIC, 2006; sampling error + 3.1%, 95%CI) Heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide Good Fat vs. Bad Fat Keep total fat intake between 20 to 35 percent of calories, with most fats coming from sources of polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, such as fish, nuts, and vegetable oils. EPA DHA "Eat a variety of (preferably oily) fish at least twice a week..." (no documented CHD) "Consume 1 g of EPA+DHA per day, preferably from oily fish. EPA+DHA supplements could be considered..." (documented CHD) "Two to four grams of EPA+DHA per day... under a physician's care" (to reduce TG's) (Kris(Kris-Etherton et al. Circulation 106: 2747, 2002) Almond Composition 1 Serving of Whole Natural Almonds (1 oz/ 28g) oz/ 14g Total Fat 14g 6g Protein 9.0 g MUFA (oleic acid 18:1) 3g Dietary Fiber (10% WHO DV) 3.5 g PUFA (linoleic acid 18:2-n6) 18:21g Sugars 160 kcal 7.4mg Vitamin E (AT) 78mg Magnesium 78mg 34mg Phytosterols 34mg Weight management surpassed cancer for the first time as a major health concern (IFIC, 2006; sampling error + 3.1%, 95%CI) 2/3 lb (0.3kg) of Angus beef Four strips of bacon Three slices of cheese and mayonnaise on a buttered sesame seed bun 1,420 calories 107g of fat http://www.enviga.com/#ComparisonChart Functional Food Drivers Aging population Chronic disease epidemic Rising health care costs HealthHealth-focused consumers Advances in technology Changing regulations Business opportunity Research linking diet to health and wellness The molecular understanding for how common dietary chemicals (nutrition) affect health by altering the expression and/or structure of an individual's genetic makeup. Nutrigenomics.UCDavis.edu We are not all the same! Sports Illustrated 2002 Tests for Identifying the Individual Gene Profile DNA Screening Kit + recommendations for optimal nutrition and lifestyle + recommendations for nutritional supplementation Sciona Inc., Boulder, CO marketed by Market America Inc., NC (Gene SNPTM, 18 genes, $250) One Person Health Sciences Inc., Vancouver, Canada (ONETestTM, 19 genes, $329) Cells taken from inside of cheek Single cell Chromosome from nucleus DNA double helix Base pairs "Purchase your custom-made supplement. Based on your nutrient profile (...) your ONEMultiTM is compounded just for you." Source: www.onepersonhealth.com Functional Food Drivers Aging population Chronic disease epidemic Rising health care costs HealthHealth-focused consumers Advances in technology Changing regulations Business opportunity Research linking diet to health and wellness Nutrition Labeling and Education Act of 1990 Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 Food and Drug Modernization Act of 1997 Qualified Health Claims (2002) Nutrition Labeling and Education Act of 1990 Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 Food and Drug Modernization Act of 1997 Qualified Health Claims (2002) "Three grams of soluble fiber daily from whole grain oat foods like Cheerios in a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol may reduce the risk of heart disease. Cheerios provides 1 gram per cup." Nutrition Labeling and Education Act of 1990 Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 Food and Drug Modernization Act of 1997 Qualified Health Claims (2002) vitamin mineral herb or other botanical amino acid a dietary substance for use by man to supplement the diet by increasing the total dietary intake (e.g., enzymes or tissues from organs or glands), or a concentrate, metabolite, constituent or extract. "This statement has not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease" Nutrition Labeling and Education Act of 1990 Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 Food and Drug Modernization Act of 1997 Qualified Health Claims (2002) Almonds Join Elite List of Foods FDA Issues "Qualified" Health Claim for Nuts "Scientific evidence suggests but does not prove that eating 1.5 ounces per day of most nuts, such as almonds, as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol may reduce the risk of heart disease. " July 14, 2003 FDA Scientific Ranking Level of FDA Proposed Qualifying Scientific Category Language Evidence High A Significant scientific agreement First level Second level Moderate B "...although there is scientific evidence supporting this claim, the evidence is not conclusive." "...some scientific evidence suggests...however FDA has concluded that this evidence is limited and not conclusive" "...very limited and preliminary scientific research suggests... FDA concludes that there is little scientific evidence supporting this claim." Third level Low C Fourth level Very low D "Two studies do not show that drinking green tea reduces the risk of breast cancer in women, but one weaker, more limited study suggests that drinking green tea may reduce this risk. Based on these studies, FDA concludes that it is highly unlikely that green tea reduces the risk of breast cancer." http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/qhc-gtea.html; http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/qhc-gtea.html; June 30, 2005 Functional Food Drivers Aging population Chronic disease epidemic Rising health care costs HealthHealth-focused consumers Advances in technology Changing regulations Business opportunity Research linking diet to health and wellness U.S. Healthy Foods Growth, 1998-2005 10.0% 8.0% 6.0% 4.0% 2.0% 0.0% -2.0% 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 Healthy Foods Market Standard www.nutritionbusiness.com NBJ Functional Foods Web Seminar February 2006 3 or more ounceounceequivalents of wholewhole-grain products/day. At least half of the grains should come from whole grains Number of Claims for Whole Grains made by Products in the U.S. 350 300 250 200 150 100 50 0 2002 2003 2004 2005 Source: Mintel, 2006 ax l~ g|x `tzt|x? bvux DC? ECCG Antioxidant Capacity of Chocolate Ding et al. Nutr Metab, 2006 Functional Food Drivers Aging population Chronic disease epidemic Rising health care costs HealthHealth-focused consumers Advances in technology Changing regulations Business opportunity Research linking diet to health and wellness Health in the from today... st 21 Century... therapy therapy monitoring diagnosis ...into the future predisposition screening targeted monitoring prevention diagnosis therapy therapy monitoring Genetics Diet Lifestyle Evolution of Functional Foods 2000 BC Here, eat this root 1000 AD That root is heathen. Say this prayer 1850 AD That prayer is superstition. Drink this potion 1940 AD That potion is snake oil. Swallow this pill 1985 AD That pill is ineffective. Take this antibiotic 2009 AD That antibiotic no longer works. Eat this root Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science University of California, Davis "Enhancing the quality of life through wine and food sciences" ...
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This note was uploaded on 05/03/2009 for the course FST 160 taught by Professor Giovanni during the Spring '08 term at UC Davis.

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