Poli 271 Study guides

Poli 271 Study guides - Poli 271 Study guides This page...

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Poli 271 Study guides This page provides study guides students may find helpful when reviewing the course readings. Follow these links to the various guides for different thinkers: Modern thought and politics Machiavelli Locke Rousseau Mill Marx Modern thought and politics study guide Politics, “Ancient” and “Modern”(Benjamin Constant) --What defines the differences between "ancient" and "modern" liberty? --What is the relationship of "private" and "public" concerns in these different ideals? -- How do ancient and modern regimes compare with respect to: *their spatial (or geographical) characteristics? *the foundations of their material life?
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*the goals they mean to promote? *the meaning or value of citizenship? *the composition of the citizenry (who is in, who was out?) *the institutional arrangements for expressing popular will? *the dangers to which they are subject? Top of document Machiavelli study guide A model of political analysis (pp. 81-92) --What is the political importance of the fact that “men are by nature envious”? --Why is history important for political architecture? --What sorts of considerations are critical for regime success and failure? --How is regime failure manifested in changes of regime types? --What is the ideal regime type for restraining the forces of regime failure and encouraging the chances of regime success? --What is the measure of regime success? Liberty and the republic (pp. 31-34, 92-10 , 113-121, 182-184) -- What is the importance of social (or class) divisions in republican polities? -- How does the institutionalization of class conflict encourage public commitment? -- How is this conflict institutionalized:
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*In the structures of government? *In the public culture of a polity? *In the legal system of a polity? *In the public responsibilities and expectations of citizens? -- What is the role of religion in political life? -- How would you characterize everyday life in a vibrant republic? The dangers of corruption (pp. 121-158) -- What is the relationship between the possibility of liberty and the historical experiences of a polity? -- What is the relationship of social inequality and corruption, and why does widespread corruption (and social inequality) make liberty more tenuous? -- Why are institutions and laws insufficient guarantees of liberty, and why are they inadequate in conditions of corruption? -- How might Machiavelli's arguments about the importance of "rewarding the people" in times of peace fit with his other concerns about sources of corruption? -- We know that Machiavelli believes men to be envious and ambitious. One expression of these traits is "ingratitude" brought on by "stinginess" or "suspicion." Which of these sources of ingratitude is most dangerous, and which is acceptable as a price for liberty? And why?
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Poli 271 Study guides - Poli 271 Study guides This page...

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