Chapter 10 - Chapter 10 Gases General Chemistry I, General...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Chapter 10 Gases General Chemistry I, General Chemistry I, 2009 Professor Maggie Ciszkowska 2009 Professor Maggie Ciszkowska Gases are highly compressible and occupy the full volume of their containers. When a gas is subjected to pressure, its volume decreases. Gases always form homogeneous mixtures with other gases. Gases only occupy about 0.1 % of the volume of their containers. Characteristics of Gases Characteristics of Gases General Chemistry I, General Chemistry I, 2009 Professor Maggie Ciszkowska 2009 Professor Maggie Ciszkowska Characteristics of Gases Characteristics of Gases General Chemistry I, General Chemistry I, 2009 Professor Maggie Ciszkowska 2009 Professor Maggie Ciszkowska Described by: P , V , m (or n ), T Temperature unit: K Pressure units: atm., torr 1 atm = 760 torr Gases ) ( ) ( area A force F P = 2 2 1 1 1 1 m N m newton Pa pascal = = = General Chemistry I, General Chemistry I, 2009 Professor Maggie Ciszkowska 2009 Professor Maggie Ciszkowska Atmosphere Pressure and the Barometer Atmospheric pressure is measured with a barometer. If a tube is inserted into a container of mercury open to the atmosphere, the mercury will rise 760 mm up the tube. Standard atmospheric pressure is the pressure required to support 760 mm of Hg in a column. 1 atm = 760 mmHg = 760 torr = = 1.01325 105 Pa = 101.325 kPa Pressure Pressure General Chemistry I, General Chemistry I, 2009 Professor Maggie Ciszkowska 2009 Professor Maggie Ciszkowska Atmosphere Pressure and the Barometer Pressure Pressure General Chemistry I, General Chemistry I, 2009 Professor Maggie Ciszkowska 2009 Professor Maggie Ciszkowska The pressures of gases NOT open to the atmosphere are measured in manometers . A manometer consists of a bulb of gas attached to a U-tube containing Hg: If P gas < P atm then P gas + P h 2 = P atm . If P gas > P atm then P gas = P atm + P h 2 . Pressure Pressure General Chemistry I, General Chemistry I, 2009 Professor Maggie Ciszkowska 2009 Professor Maggie Ciszkowska Temperature and mass of a gas is constant (the volume of a fixed quantity of gas is inversely proportional to its pressure ) : V directly proportional to 1/ P V = const.(1/ P ) or PV = const. for T= const . and m (or n) = const . P 1 V 1 = P 2 V 2 T= const ., m= const . Gases Boyles Law General Chemistry I, General Chemistry I, 2009 Professor Maggie Ciszkowska 2009 Professor Maggie Ciszkowska If a gas at 760 torr in a 400 cm 3 container has its pressure changed to 10.00 atm with no change in temperature. Find the final volume. Gases Boyles Law General Chemistry I, General Chemistry I, 2009 Professor Maggie Ciszkowska 2009 Professor Maggie Ciszkowska If a gas at 760 torr in a 400 cm 3 container has its pressure changed to 10.00 atm with no change in temperature. Find the final volume....
View Full Document

Page1 / 70

Chapter 10 - Chapter 10 Gases General Chemistry I, General...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 11. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online