Alcohol_Nutrition.09w - Core Alcohol and Drug Survey...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–12. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
   
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    Core Alcohol and Drug Survey Conducted at Cornell in 2000, 2003, & 2005 719 respondents in 2003 1595 in 2004 1969 in 2005
Background image of page 2
    Gannett Web Site http://www.gannett.cornell.edu/top10Top
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    Gannett Core Alcohol and Drug Survey. 2005. http://www.gannett.cornell.edu/top10Topics/alcohol-tobacco-drugs/AOD/cornellUse.html
Background image of page 4
    Gannett 2005 Survey 83% of Cornell students consume alcohol 45% of the 83% engage in “high-risk drinking 5 or more drinks in a sitting 49% of males and 42% of females engaged in high-risk drinking 72% of sorority members engaged in high- risk drinking 36% of female non-sorority members engaged in high-risk drinking Cornell Daily Sun, Feb 23, 2006
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    2005 Dietary Guidelines for  Americans Those who choose to drink alcoholic beverages should do so sensibly and in moderation—defined as the consumption of up to one drink per day for women and up to two drinks per day for men.
Background image of page 6
    2005 Dietary Guidelines for  Americans Alcoholic beverages should not be consumed by some individuals, including those who cannot restrict their alcohol intake, women of childbearing age who may become pregnant, pregnant and lactating women, children and adolescents, individuals taking medications that can interact with alcohol, and those with specific medical conditions.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    2005 Dietary Guidelines for  Americans Alcoholic beverages should be avoided by individuals engaging in activities that require attention, skill, or coordination, such as driving or operating machinery.
Background image of page 8
    Alcohol Ethanol or ethyl alcohol Produced by yeast fermentation of sugars Provides calories (7 kcal/g) Serves no essential function (not a nutrient)
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    Alcohol Absorption Absorption is rapid Absorption begins in mouth Upper small intestine is primary site of absorption Food slows alcohol absorption
Background image of page 10
Fig. 7-1, p. 3 Salivary glands Produce enzymes that help break down starch and fats Oral cavity Tongue Mastication and mixing
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 12
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 05/04/2009 for the course FD SC 150 taught by Professor Gravani&miller during the Spring '07 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

Page1 / 35

Alcohol_Nutrition.09w - Core Alcohol and Drug Survey...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 12. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online