Understanding_Eating_Disorders_From_Etiology_to_Treatment

Understanding_Eating_Disorders_From_Etiology_to_Treatment -...

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Understanding Eating Disorders –From Etiology to Treatment Gregory T. Eells, PhD, Director Associate Director, Gannett Health Services, Cornell University
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Introduction An estimated five million Americans, predominantly women and adolescent girls, suffer from some form of eating disorder. Eating Disorders cause substantial physical and psychosocial morbidity. Eating disorders have been linked to various biological processes, societal focus on thinness, and the medical profession’s concern about young women’s bodies
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Types of Eating Disorders Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorder NOS Bulimia nervosa Not a “case” Eating Disorder “case” Not a “case”
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Types of Eating Disorders Can’t be diagnosed with Anorexia and Bulimia at the same time. NOS is a residual category though most common. Outpatient settings Half patients are NOS, one third Bulimia remainder anorexia. Inpatient settings underweight NOS or Anorexia Others “sub-thershold”
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Anorexia Nervosa Overvaluation (self-worth based largely or exclusively on) shape and weight. Strong desire to be thin intense fear of gaining weight and becoming fat. Active maintenance of unduly low body weight (less than 85% expected or BMI < 17.5 Amenorrhea (questionable)
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Anorexia Nervosa Engage in sever restriction of food intake. Motives can be asceticism, competitiveness, attention. Sense of self-control Over-exercise-takes precedence over other aspects of life Subgroup has loss of control over eating (not objectively large amounts
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Anorexia Nervosa Depressive and anxiety features Irritability Liability of mood Impaired concentration Loss of sexual appetite Obsessional symptoms
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Anorexia Nervosa Starts in mid-teenage years with dietary restriction Early on is self-limiting and treatment responsive. Can become entrenched and require more intensive treatment 10-20% of cases intractable and unremitting Even in recovery some residual over concern about shape and weight
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Anorexia Nervosa Early onset with short history better treatment outcomes.
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This note was uploaded on 05/04/2009 for the course FD SC 150 taught by Professor Gravani&miller during the Spring '07 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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Understanding_Eating_Disorders_From_Etiology_to_Treatment -...

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