AECT250-Lecture 3

AECT250-Lecture 3 - Lecture 3 Tension members Steel tension...

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Lecture 3 - Page 1 of 7 Lecture 3 – Tension members Steel tension members are perhaps the simplest members to design. There is no compressive, bending, shear or other stresses involved. Typical structural members that are under tension loads are: Trusses Bracing Hangers The design of steel tension members is found in the following locations in the LRFD Manual: AISC Part 5 AISC SPEC Chapter D p. 16.1-26 AISC SPEC Chapter D p. 16.1-249 There are 2 types of failure mechanisms for tension members. The first is yielding on the gross area and the second is fracture on the net section . Yielding on Gross Area Yielding on the gross area refers to “stretching” of the gross cross- sectional area of the member: The LRFD design strength for yielding on gross section in tension = φ t P n The ASD allowable strength for yielding on gross section in tension = n P where: φ t = 0.90 (LRFD) = 1.67 (ASD) P n = nominal strength of member = F y A g F y = yield stress of steel (see AISC p. 2-39) A g = gross cross-sect. area (see AISC Part 1)
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Lecture 3 - Page 2 of 7 Fracture on Net Section Fracture on the net section refers to “breaking” the section perpendicular from the direction of force through the reduced cross-sectional area of a member, typically across the bolt holes.
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AECT250-Lecture 3 - Lecture 3 Tension members Steel tension...

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