AECT250-Lecture 7

AECT250-Lecture 7 - Lecture 7 Composite Steel Beams Steel...

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Lecture 7 - Page 1 of 10 Lecture 7 – Composite Steel Beams Steel beams are usually used to carry a metal deck-supported concrete slab. In non-composite construction, the beam does NOT interact structurally with the slab – the slab is simply dead weight. This is because the slab is not adequately bonded to the beam. Non-Composite Construction The word “composite” means 2 or more different materials. In composite construction, the slab is adequately bonded to the steel beam by means of headed “shear studs” resulting in a composite beam. The concrete acts like a large “flange” in compression, while a much greater portion of the steel beam acts in tension. The result is a VERY efficient beam – as much as 40% to 60% lighter weight steel than non-composite . Composite Construction Headed shear studs welded thru metal deck to beam flange
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Lecture 7 - Page 2 of 10 Notice that the neutral axis (N.A.) in the non-composite beam is located in the middle of the section. This indicates that half of the beam section is in tension and half is in compression. In the composite section, the compression is carried ENTIRELY by the concrete, while the tension is carried by the beam.
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This note was uploaded on 05/05/2009 for the course AE AE250 taught by Professor Hultenius during the Fall '08 term at SUNY Delhi.

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AECT250-Lecture 7 - Lecture 7 Composite Steel Beams Steel...

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