AECT250-Lecture 12

AECT250-Lecture 12 - Lecture 12 Bolted Connections Below is...

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Lecture 12 - Page 1 of 9 Lecture 12 – Bolted Connections Below is a typical bolt and the terms given to the parts of a bolt: Bolts used in structural steel fasteners fall within 2 categories – see AISC Table 2-5 p. 2-41: 1) Carbon steel bolts – These bolts achieve their total strength from shear (or tension) strength across the diameter of the bolt. They are relatively low-strength and are used primarily for low-load applications such as for anchor rods. The typical carbon steel bolt used in structural steel buildings is ASTM A307 and F1554 for use in anchor rods. 2) High-strength bolts – These bolts are used for high-load connections and obtain their total strength from the shear strength across the diameter of the bolt PLUS the friction developed between the nut and joined steel surfaces. In order to achieve the friction capacity, these bolts are tensioned to 70% of the ultimate tensile strength of the material according to the table below. ASTM A325 and A490 bolts are typically used. The LRFD references the design of bolted connections in the following: AISC Spec. Chapter J3 (p. 16.1-102) AISC Part 7 AISC Part 9 AISC Part 10
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Lecture 12 - Page 2 of 9 Possible Bolted Shear Failure Mechanisms: There are 4 basic types of failure mechanisms for bolted connections under shear: 1) Bolt Shear : This is probably the most obvious failure mode. It occurs when the
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This note was uploaded on 05/05/2009 for the course AE AE250 taught by Professor Hultenius during the Fall '08 term at SUNY Delhi.

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AECT250-Lecture 12 - Lecture 12 Bolted Connections Below is...

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