AECT250-Lecture 14

AECT250-Lecture 14 - Lecture 14 Welded Connections Welding...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lecture 14 – Welded Connections Welding is a procedure that involves fusing two pieces of steel together by melting a sacrificial “flux” electrode to two pieces, thereby joining the pieces permanently together. They have some distinct advantages over bolted connections including: Welded joints are more rigid than bolted joints Can directly connect pieces without the need for connection plates Welds do not create holes in member (i.e., no need to check fracture on net area) Can join odd-shaped pieces together Welds also have some disadvantages which may preclude their use, including: Welds are brittle, not ductile like bolted connections Very labor intensive Skilled labor required Quality control is difficult to inspect Potential fire hazard in areas of welding Fillet Welds: The most common type of weld for structural steel connections is the “fillet” weld. This type of weld joins 2 pieces with flat faces at 90 0 angles. Some examples of fillet welds and their weld symbols are shown below:
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 6

AECT250-Lecture 14 - Lecture 14 Welded Connections Welding...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online