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AECT250-Lecture 33

AECT250-Lecture 33 - Lecture 33 Columns Concrete Columns...

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Lecture 33 - Page 1 of 14 Lecture 33 – Columns Concrete Columns: Concrete is good at resisting compression but poor in resisting tension. So, it might make sense that concrete would be the material of choice for columns. It is true that concrete IS used for compression members such as columns, piers, bearing walls and pedestals. Members under pure compression could then (theoretically) be unreinforced. These members are often subject to additional forces such as moment that would put some tensile forces into the member and would thus necessitate the addition of tension reinforcement. Most columns have combined compression and bending . They are essentially a “beam-column”. The compression capacity of a reinforced column is reduced by the bending stresses on the column and vice-versa. A graph of the axial load capacity of a column vs. the moment capacity of a typical column is shown below: Axial compression capacity Bending moment capacity Pure compression Pure bending
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