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Week 2 - StOC2552-03 StOC2552-03 Donnalyn Pompper Ph.D APR...

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Unformatted text preview: StOC2552-03 StOC2552-03 Donnalyn Pompper, Ph.D., APR Week 2 Practitioners of Public Relations Practitioners Overview Overview Number of practitioners Distribution of practitioners Majority female ‘Minorities’ Statistics about practitioners Practitioners’ salaries The glass ceiling Practitioners’ responsibilities Roles of practitioners Professionalism Requirements for success Number of practitioners Number 243,000 in U.S. (Bureau of Labor Statistics) (Bureau 243,000 Growth is worldwide Fortune and U.S. News & World Report rate PR among the most rapidly growing and “best jobs” and Distribution of practitioners Distribution Greatest numbers of Public Relations Greatest Society of America (PRSA) members are in California, New York, Texas, Ohio, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Illinois Michigan, Single largest employer for PR is the Single federal government (NFP) – 4,400 public affairs professionals affairs Majority female Majority Increasing Rate of Women as PR Practitioners (US Department of Labor data) W mnP S e i l ss oe R p ca t i 7 0 6 0 5 0 4 0 3 0 2 0 1 0 0 16 98 18 93 Ya er 19 90 5 0 6 6 % 2 5 Note: Data from colleges and universities indicate that twice as many as female students major in public relations than males. ‘Minorities’ Reaching across U.S. demographics Globalization Ethnic minorities severely underrepresented, Ethnic especially in corporations especially Hispanic PR agencies Fluency in Spanish usually required “General market” opportunities? “General market” opportunities? African-American PR agencies African-American Statistics about practitioners Statistics Education 90% college graduates; 30% some post 90% grad; 28% master’s; 2% doctorate grad; 350 institutions offer PR degrees Continuing ed courses by PRSA, IABC Most difficult positions to fill are those that Most require specialized background (e.g., computer tech, corporate finance, health care, agriculture). tech, Journalism background not essential, but Journalism helpful helpful Practitioners’ salaries Practitioners’ Highest in corporate settings Industry, manufacturing High-tech, power utilities With lots of experience $300,000-$500,000; With median salary in 2004 was $82,000; entry level ~$25,000 level Men earn more; glass ceiling Salaries highest in Northeast, Mid-Atlantic The glass ceiling The In addition to salary gap . . . In “Mommy track” Fewer promotions Tokenism Compete and manage one’s own career Practitioners’ responsibilities Practitioners’ Day-to-day responsibilities Writing and editing Media relations and placement Research Management and administration Counseling Special events Speaking Production Training Contact Roles of practitioners Roles Technician Role and Manager Role PR Technicians Communication Technician Communication Facilitator Traditional core PR work Low threat Lower-paid Not part of management inner circle PR Managers Problem-Solving Expert Prescriber PR excellence High threat Higher-paid Part of management inner circle Note: The major predictor of public relations excellence was the extent to which the organization’s top public relations executive was able to enact the management role versus the technician role. Professionalism Professionalism Qualifies as a profession? Specialized education Unique, essential service Emphasis on public service and social Emphasis responsibility over private interests responsibility “Autonomy with responsibility” among Autonomy practitioners practitioners Code of ethics, standards for performance Requirements for success Requirements Results Conceptualizing (focus, good listener) Human relations (team player) Style (can-do attitude) Intangibles (charisma) Summary Summary Number of practitioners Distribution of practitioners Majority female ‘Minorities’ Statistics about practitioners Practitioners’ salaries The glass ceiling Practitioners’ responsibilities Roles of practitioners Professionalism Requirements for success ...
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  • Spring '09
  • POMPPER,DONALYN
  • Public Relations, Practitioners of Public Relations Practitioners, Autonomy practitioners practitioners, practitioners Professionalism Requirements, glass ceiling Practitioners, practitioners Distribution

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