lect5422 - 1. Can sound waves be polarized? 2. If all the...

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1. Can sound waves be polarized? 2. If all the labels had come off the sunglasses in the drug store, how could you tell which ones were polarized?
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Interference by Thin Film
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A beam of light reflected by a material whose index of refraction is greater than that of the material in which it is traveling, changes phase by ½ cycle.
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Holography
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Early Quantum Theory and Models of the Atom
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Discovery of Electron
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Cathode Rays
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e/m measurement
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kg C m e r B E m e / 10 76 . 1 ; 11 2 × = =
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Oil-Drop Experiment to find e
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Thomson’s Model
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Rutherford’s Model
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Blackbody Radiation
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All objects emit radiation whose total intensity is proportional to the fourth power of the Kelvin temperature.
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A blackbody is a body that would absorb all the radiation falling on it.
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Wien’s Law K m T p × = - 3 10 9 . 2 λ
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The Sun’s Surface Temperature
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lect5422 - 1. Can sound waves be polarized? 2. If all the...

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