Oceanography test 4

Oceanography test 4 - April 11, 2008 3 Things you are...

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April 11, 2008 3 Things you are interested in as an oceanographer: 1. Difference in sexual reproduction a. Spawning – animals come together in an area at specific time. An environment trigger will cause a massive release of egg and sperm. This maximizes ability to exchange genetic material. No post fertilization care of the young. b. Selective Mating – animals come together in a particular area. They spend time deciding which individual to mate with. There is a great reduction in exchange of genetic material and reduction in the output of young. 2. Ability of groups of organisms based on their complexity to create ecosystems. Smaller organisms are more likely to form ecosystems. (Ex: Sponges) 3. Ability of organisms based on their complexity to control ecosystems. No correlation. Sponges: 1. Two layers 2. Can create ecosystems 3. Cavity of sponges filled with worms and clams (they live in the central cavity which has water being directed into it by pores) 4. Sponge has 3 cell types: a. Skin cells – protect animal, provide structure b. Digestive cells – flagella and microvilli; flagella beat to move water and capture particles to digest c. Amoeboid cells – transport food; primitive circulation so everyone gets nourished Jellyfish, Sea Anima, Corals = Stingers: 1. Medusa fish – have stingers placed on tentacles; tentacles capture prey and immobilize it 2. Coral polyp – best at forming an ecosystem through symbiotic relationships
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Flatworms: 1. Simple organism 2. Two layers 3. Bilateral symmetry Segmented Worms: 1. Polychaete – body segments are similar; form rich ecosystems 2. More developed appendages can capture Mollusks: 1. Well developed organs verses segmented bodies 2. Clams, snails, squids 3. Inhalant current to bring water in and exhalent current to bring water out 4. Snails without shells – do well in the environment; colorful which lets other organisms know they are toxic 5. Squid retain shell Crustaceans: 1. Segmented body parts 2. Like segmented worms but have developed a hard exoskeleton 3. Have to molt – shed entire exoskeleton; must be in secluded area to do that; takes shell a day to harden and during this time they are very susceptible to predation Chordates: 1. Notochord and no backbone 2. Reduction in ability to create ecosystem 3. Amphioxus (simplest) – have notochord that enhances specialization of the body parts
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4. No mouth, instead have buchal cavity Sharks: 1. Stop have spawning 2. Made of cartilage not bone Bony Fish: 1. Being to evolve near costal waters (salinity content in cells) 2. Very prolific 3. Have fins that can move independently 4. More mobility than sharks 5. Selective mating and spawning April 14, 2008 Ecosystems: 1. Ecosystems include all plants, animals, bacteria and viruses 2. Include all physical and chemical properties of an environment 3. Also include how these things interact with one another 4. Inputs and outputs – there are no closed ecosystems 5. Sun is important input
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This note was uploaded on 05/05/2009 for the course OCS 1005 taught by Professor Condrey during the Spring '08 term at LSU.

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Oceanography test 4 - April 11, 2008 3 Things you are...

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