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languageracism - The Language of Racism and Racialization...

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The Language of Racism and Racialization in U.S. English: Some Basics
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Is there still racism in the U.S.? Indicator Type Statistic Hispanic African- American White Economic Median Per Capita Income 13,210 15,191 26,550 Median household income 34,099 29,939 47,041 Household Net Worth 9,750 7,500 79,400 Home Ownership 46% 47% 72% Unemployment 7.8% 10.3% 4.2% Poverty rate 22.6% 24.9% 8.1% Health Without health insurance 32.4% 20.2% 10.7% Life Expectancy 76.8 72.5 77.8 Infant Mortality .057% .14% .058% Social Married Couple Household 67.9% 47.9% 81% Female-headed Household 23.4% 44.0% 13.9% Women never married 30.0% 39.7% 20.8% High School Degree 61% 78.6% 92% B.A. Degree 16% 17% 34% Incarceration per 100,000 280 736 132 TABLE I. DISPARITIES IN ECONOMIC, HEALTH, AND SOCIAL INDICATORS BY "RACE" IN U.S. (2000-2002)
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What is Racism? The “Folk Theory” of Racism, Part I People everywhere prefer to be with their own kind. Racism is a matter of individual belief. Racists believe that people of color are biologically inferior to Whites, so White privilege is deserved and must be defended. Racist individuals act out these beliefs in word and deed Racist beliefs were very widespread in the past, but today the only people who still believe these things are ignorant, vicious and remote from the mainstream. Policy Implications: Ignorance can be cured by education. Viciousness can be cured by increasing the self-esteem of racists by enhancing their well- being, so they will not have to look down on and persecute others. Both education and general well-being are increasing, so racism, which has been greatly reduced, should soon disappear entirely and, where it persists, will become a sign simply of mental derangement or disability.
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What is racism? The Folk theory of racism, part II: Races are biologically real, resulting from the diverse geographical origins of American populations. Biological mixing will gradually erase this diversity. Racism will disappear by itself, since there will be no differences left for racists to notice.
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What is Racism? The Critical Theory of Racism: Racism is a set of collective cultural projects that are adaptive and dynamic. These projects have the following goals: 1)the production of a taxonomy of human types, the “races” 2) the assignment of individuals and groups within the taxonomy of races through "racialization" or "racial formation" 3) the arrangement of these races in a hierarchy 4) the movement of material and symbolic resources from the lower levels of the hierarchy to the upper levels in such a way as to a) elevate Whiteness as a virtuous exemplar, and accumulate privileges and resources to Whites, and b) to denigrate and pejorate Color so that privileges and resources can be denied to people of color.
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WHITE AMERICAN LANGUAGE IDEOLOGIES AND THE FORMS OF RACIST SPEECH 1) Words reflect beliefs. If someone utters a racist remark, that person is a racist.
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