The Political Ecology of Spain's Far Northern Frontier, Part I_D2L

The Political Ecology of Spain's Far Northern Frontier, Part I_D2L

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The Political Ecology of Spain’s Far Northern Frontier, Part I: Mining and Agriculture ANTH 418
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Beyond Tenochtitlán Hernán Cortés dispatched expeditions to gather more information on people/land to find a passageway to Asia to outflank rivals Speculation and rumor in the 1520s & 1530s Seven Golden Cities of Cíbola
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(I) Cabeza de Vaca and Esteban, 1528-1536 Antonio de Mendoza, Viceroy of New Spain (II) Marcos de Niza, a Franciscan friar If you believe his report, he seems to have viewed from a distance one of the Zuni villages in New Mexico “gold that the natives make into vessels and jewels for the ears, and into little blades with which they wipe away their sweat.” Marcos de Niza’s reputation among scholars
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Exploration of the North, III Francisco Vázquez de Coronado, governor of the province of Nueva Galicia In 1540, 336 Spaniards and hundreds of indigenous allies, head north Adobe Villages rather than Golden Cities “Land of Quivira,” to Wichita, Kansas “Strange, shaggy cows” instead of gold
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Spaniards Out of Mesoamerica Encountered a different physical and cultural landscape, where water was scarce, farming difficult, and where many Native Americans lived as hunters and gatherers, or a combination of sedentary and nomadic existence. Spanish colonial enterprise unfolded in all directions; it developed different institutions, regional economies, and patterns of settlement. Many adaptations were successful, at least for a time…but distances too great, landscape too rugged, and Native Americans too elusive for the region to be completely incorporated into empire
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Defining Our Terms Greater Southwest – a frontier area where
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This note was uploaded on 05/06/2009 for the course ANTH 418 taught by Professor Adams/brescia during the Spring '09 term at University of Arizona- Tucson.

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The Political Ecology of Spain's Far Northern Frontier, Part I_D2L

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