1_Introduction_&_History - Microbiology The study of...

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Microbiology The study of little teeny weeny tiny things How tiny? Large yeast cell:  1 mm in diameter Viruses:  20-200 nm [what’s a nm?] Bacteria:  2-20  μ m [what’s a  μ m?] Useful unit relationships for helping us to  think small:   1000  μ m = 1 mm 1000 nm = 1  μ m
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Figure 1.13 (Nester)
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What critters do we study in microbiology? Protozoa ( Paramecia, Amoeba, Plasmodia) Algae  (Euglena, Spirogyra, Gonyaulax) Fungi (molds and yeasts like  Saccharomyces  cerevisiae ) Bacteria Viruses, viroids, prions Q:  Which of the above are prokaryotes? Q:  Which of the above are eukaryotes? Q:  Which of the above are noncellular entities? Chapter 12
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19 th  Century (1860s – early 1900s)  “Golden Age of Microbiology”
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Milestones in microbiology Microbiology born as a science in 1600s Why then? Invention of microscopes Build your own!: http://www.cartage.org.lb/en/themes/sciences/Physics/Optics/Optic alInstruments/Microscope/Leeuwenhoeks/Leeuwenhoeks.htm
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Antoni van Leeuwenhoek “Father of Microbiology” Dutch drapery merchant  (Delft, Holland) Ground lenses to view  fabric Used lens to peer into a  drop of lake water…and  then everything he could  get hands on and  discovered “a nimicules” http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:Anton_v
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Leeuwenhoek’s firsts: 1. First to describe protozoans 2. First to describe spermatozoan (hesitated  reporting for fear it might be considered  obscene) 3. 1683, remarkably, described bacteria 4. Kept meticulous records and submitted  reports to the Royal Society of London  (375 letters between 1674-1723)
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Robert Hooke  (1635-1703) Englishman, sickly kid,  badly scarred by smallpox Somehow got to Oxford  University Brilliant and capable  experimenter in many areas  of science But, nasty, argumentative,  antisocial, miserly In spite of all that    Curator of Experiments for  the Royal Society of  London
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Hooke’s accomplishments Physics:  Hooke’s  Law (action of  springs) Techniques in  compound  microscopy Micrographia   (1655) Thin sections of  cork – coined the  word, “cells”
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3 key questions in 18 th  – 19 th   centuries really kick-started  microbiology: 1. Does spontaneous generation occur?
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