Roche_et_al-2013-Drug_and_Alcohol_Review.pdf - bs_bs_banner R E V I E W Drug and Alcohol Review(March 2013 32 124132 DOI 10.1111\/dar.12017 REVIEW

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REVIEW Alcohol and young people: What the legislation says about access and secondary supply ANN M. ROCHE, TANIA STEENSON & RACHEL ANDREW National Centre for Education and Training on Addiction, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia Abstract Issue. The rationale and potential impact of Australia’s recent legislative changes regulating secondary supply of alcohol to minors, particularly on private premises. Approach. An examination of similarities and differences between state and territory liquor licensing legislation regulating secondary supply of alcohol to minors was undertaken. Key Findings. The Northern Territory, New South Wales, Queensland, Tasmania and Victoria prohibit supply of alcohol to minors on private premises, except by parents/guardians/authorised persons. Northern Territory, Queensland and Tasmanian legislation also prescribes that supply must occur responsibly and under supervision. Elsewhere, alcohol supply to minors on private premises is unregulated. These legislative changes reflect the ‘familialisation’ of adolescent drinking. Implications. Recent legislative amendments regulating secondary supply on private premises may indicate growing awareness of adolescent alcohol-related harms and signal a shift in community norms.However,sociocultural factors,misunderstanding and challenges in enforcing the legislation may limit compliance. Conclusions. Changes in secondary supply legislation need effective dissemination as divergence between states and territories may result in confusion about legal responsibilities. A national approach may be warranted to help set community boundaries for young people’s drinking. [Roche AM, Steenson T, Andrew R. Alcohol and young people: What the legislation says about access and secondary supply. Drug Alcohol Rev 2013;32:124–132] Key words: alcohol, minors, secondary supply, legislation, parents. Introduction Adolescent alcohol consumption is a source of increas- ing concern in a number of countries [1]. In Australia, alcohol plays a major role in the social lives of young people [2] and, despite being unable to purchase alcohol, by age 17 most adolescents have started to drink alcohol [3,4]. Consumption generally occurs under parental surveillance in private homes, with ado- lescents aged 12–17 obtaining alcohol from a parent, relative or friends/peers [3,4]. As Australia does not have a legislated minimum drinking age, alcohol supply and consumption on private premises has been unofficially regulated and influenced by social convention. Age of initiation, context, frequency, amount and type of alcohol con- sumed by adolescents is shaped by modifiable family, economic and environmental factors. The majority of adolescents either abstain or drink alcohol at a low risk level (59%), with a minority (20%) of 16- to 17-year- olds drinking riskily on a monthly basis [4].
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