LEC 9 - MCB 102 Professor Buchanan Lecture 23 ASUC Lecture...

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MCB 102 Professor Buchanan 3/16/09 Lecture 23 ASUC Lecture Notes Online is the only authorized note-taking service at UC Berkeley. Do not share, copy or illegally distribute (electronically or otherwise) these notes. Our student-run program depends on your individual subscription for its continued existence. These notes are copyrighted by the University of California and are for your personal use only. D O N O T C O P Y Sharing or copying these notes is illegal and could end note taking for this course. ANNOUNCEMENTS Last time, I announced that my regular office hours for the week of May 16 will be cancelled, and I will be holding alternative office hours. LECTURE We finished last lecture by talking about fatty acid catabolism. The intermediates in the citric acid cycle can be used to regenerate glucose, which can be used to feed the brain, one of the primary objectives of the body. This leads to the cycle intermediates being depleted since animals cannot convert acetyl CoA into carbohydrates. One way to bypass this is the formation of ketone bodies from acetyl CoA. One byproduct is alpha- beta-hydroxybutyrate. This is the last topic I want to cover in the lipid chapter, and I recommend you read the chapter for fatty acid biosynthesis.
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MCB 102 ASUC Lecture Notes Online: Approved by the UC Board of Regents 3/16/09 D O N O T C O P Y Sharing or copying these notes is illegal and could end note taking for this course. 2 Lecture IX: Amino Acid Oxidation and the Production of Urea Today’s lecture is on amino acid oxidation. There is a typo in the reader: specifically, you will be responsible for pages 689-706. So today, we’ll be going over the nitrogen cycle and other metabolic reactions. The figure 21-1 in the reader shows the nitrogen cycle. I show it because there’s been a change in it. Humans depend on plants and other sources for nitrogen sources. What we do is we degrade the amino acids and produce ammonia, which is the opposite of what plants do. An updated figure is figure 22-1 from the book. If we start with nitrogen in the atmosphere, there are nitrogen-fixing bacteria, the archaea, special microorganisms that carry out a number of these processes. So nitrogen is fixed into ammonia, and then oxidized to nitrite. It’s then converted to nitrate by nitrifying bacteria,
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This note was uploaded on 05/07/2009 for the course MCB 58168 taught by Professor Thorner during the Spring '09 term at Berkeley.

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LEC 9 - MCB 102 Professor Buchanan Lecture 23 ASUC Lecture...

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