LEC 6 - MCB 136 Professor Terry Machen 3/12/09 Lecture 16...

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MCB 136 Professor Terry Machen 3/12/09 Lecture 16 ASUC Lecture Notes Online is the only authorized note-taking service at UC Berkeley. Do not share, copy or illegally distribute (electronically or otherwise) these notes. Our student-run program depends on your individual subscription for its continued existence. These notes are copyrighted by the University of California and are for your personal use only. D O N O T C O P Y Sharing or copying these notes is illegal and could end note taking for this course. ANNOUNCEMENTS There next exam will take place the Tuesday after break, March 31 st . Not the greatest timing, but it will give you extra time to catch up. I don’t have a room yet, but a week from today at 7PM I will do a review session to go over difficult concepts. Then I will cover questions and answers from the reader and the book. I will also have some extra office hours, every day from 5-6PM. I encourage you to go over questions in the book and reader. We can omit numbers 5 (p113), 9 (p113), 16 (p114), and 20 (see if you can work through 20 as best you can). LECTURE Today I will talk about respiration . There is a lot in the reader in terms of figures and notes that I won’t cover. I will first talk about anatomy, then ventilation. Ventilation refers to getting air in and out of the lungs. It’s not a trivial process. All this requires work, so I’ll talk a bit about the work of breathing and the role of compliance , which is also relevant to the cardiovascular system. Compliance refers to the ability to stretch out the lungs with a given pressure inside due to the surface tension. I will discuss dead space in the lungs, which is the area that doesn’t exchange oxygen. Then I will discuss what happens to the air once it is inside the lungs. Air dissolves in the water in the lungs, then it diffuses into the blood stream. There is gas dissolving and diffusing, and both are important chemical processes. We’ll discuss the distinction between diffusion and perfusion. In general, the rate of blood flow through the lungs is limiting, compared to how fast it diffuses in. I will talk about pulmonary circulation, if there is time. We’ll start in terms of actual figures on page 91. This shows the simple anatomy of the respiratory system. So it’s basically these tubes that go from the mouth and the pharynx into the lungs. There is the pharynx, and the esophagus down the front. The larynx is located close to the esophagus. The air goes down into the trachea and starts splitting into a right and left bronchus . That gets smaller, and then the air is bound inside the thoracic cavity by the bottom and ribcage.
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MCB 136 ASUC Lecture Notes Online: Approved by the UC Board of Regents 3/12/09 D O N O T C O P Y Sharing or copying these notes is illegal and could end note taking for this course. 2
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LEC 6 - MCB 136 Professor Terry Machen 3/12/09 Lecture 16...

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