EOSC 270 Assignment 1

EOSC 270 Assignment 1 - EOSC 270 Assignment 1 Patterns...

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EOSC 270 Andrea Smid Assignment 1 68603042 Mar.10 th , 2009 Patterns – Describe what you see 1. a) Date: Feb.13 th , 2009 Time: 1:30pm – 3:00pm Duration: 1.5 hours c) Tidal conditions: - It was neither spring nor neap tide during my field visit due to the fact that full moon, and therefore spring tide, occurred on Feb.9 th , 2009 and neap tide occurred on Feb.16 th , 2009 during the third quarter of the moon cycle (Moon phases for Vancouver, Canada in 2009). - My field visit occurred just prior to a low tide, which occurred at 2:53pm on Feb.13 th , 2009 and was at a height of 1.7m (Fisheries & Oceans Canada). - The tidal range was from 1.7m (lowest low tide) to 4.8m (highest high tide) as reported by Fisheries & Oceans Canada. - There was a semi-diurnal tide on the day of my field visit as there were 2 high (at 3.8m 2. a) Intertidal zonation is the horizontal banding of organisms that live in the intertidal zone due to both biotic (biological interactions between various organisms) and abiotic (physical environment) factors. Each zone or band is distinct from the adjacent zone in colour, morphology of the dominant organism or some combination of colour and morphology. The bandwidths of an intertidal zone depend on the amount of exposure of each zone and on the slope of the rocks in the zone (Nybakken & Bertness, 2005). The intertidal zone is commonly divided into 4 subdivisions – the splash and spray zone (supralittoral), high tide zone (littoral), mid tide zone (midlittoral) and the low tide zone (infralittoral) (Nybakken & Bertness, 2005). b) Intertidal zonation is clearly present at the site of my field visit due to the observable bands of organisms located on both the large rocks piled up in the middle of the intertidal zone and on the small rocks that litter the entire zone. The uppermost zone was dominated by barnacles followed by a band of mussels ( Mytilus ) and seaweed (including Fucus ), forming a canopy that protects a number of other organisms such as snails ( Littorina and Nucella ) and crabs ( Nudus and Oregonensis ). The low intertidal zone was dominated by sea stars ( Pisaster ) and sea urchins. Refer below for a picture of the zonation observable on the large rocks in the intertidal zone.
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3. Category Microalgae Sea hair (green) Macroalgae Long laver ( Porphyra pseudolinearis ) Microfauna (<1mm) Sea flee Macrofauna Mussels ( Mytilus ) Megafauna Seals Epifauna Acorn barnacles ( Balanus ) Infauna Varnished clams Primary Producer Fucus Primary Consumer Periwinkles ( Littorina littorea ) Tertiary Consumer Sculpins (fish) or sea gulls Herbivore Periwinkles ( Littorina sculata ) Carnivore Dogwhelk ( Nucella lapillus ) Detritivore Polychaetes Filter Feeder Oysters Deposit Feeder Naked shore crab ( Nudus ) Scavenger Green shore crab ( Oregonensis ) Predator Sea star ( Pisaster ) Grazer Limpets
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Processes and mechanisms – what drives the patterns? 4. The physical factors that are most likely responsible for the pattern of zonation previously
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EOSC 270 Assignment 1 - EOSC 270 Assignment 1 Patterns...

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