Chapter 33 - Chapter 33 Noncoelomate invertebrates Parazoa...

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Chapter 33 Noncoelomate invertebrates Parazoa I. Phylum – Porifera (pore bearing) A. Characteristics; 1. asymmetry, some considered radial 2. no tissues or organs 3. specialized cell types 4. filter feeding 5. sessile 6. waste – diffusion of ammonia 7. gas exchange = diffusion B. Cell types 1. pinacocytes – form outer layer of sponge 2. amoebocytes – move around in a jellylike matrix (mesohyle) functions; food storage and transport, skeleton formation, reproduction 3. Choanocytes = (collar cells) unique to phylum flagellated cells that filter bacteria, algae, protists (food vacuole)
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C. Skeleton – used for classification 1. Spicules – needle like spines CaCO 3 SiO 2 2. Spongin – protein fiber (collagen) 3. skeleton = spicules, spongin or both D. Body types (forms) 1. Ascon –most simple body form, spongocoel is lined with choanocytes, single osculum (small) 2. Sycon – folding of the ascon body plan radial canals that are lined with choanocytes. Spongocoel & osculum 3. Leucon – most complex, most common, chambers lined with choanocytes, increased filtering = increased size E. Classes of sponges 1. Calcarea a. CaCO 3 spicules b. All 3 body plans c. All marine 2. Hexactinellida – glass sponges a. SiO 2 spicules, six spined (hex) b. sycon or leucon
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3. Demospongiae – bath sponges a.
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