MGT 210 Final - Best Practices Manual for Supervisors Lisa...

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Best Practices Manual for Supervisors Lisa McClure MGT 210 Kimberly Jones Axia College of University of Phoenix June 29, 2008
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Best Practices Manual 2 You made it. Years of hard work, long hours and sacrifice. Your friends are patting you on the back, happy one of their own made it from blue- collar to the white-collar world. Are you ready for your new responsibility? How will you transition from peer to supervisor? What are some of the mistakes many make you would hope to avoid? (Lisoski, 2007) N ew supervisors play a key role in any organization's growth and development for many reasons, not the least of which is the fact that their main responsibility is creating a link between technical employees and upper management. Not only do new managers have a huge impact on the bottom line of most organizations but they also represent their firms 24 hours a day, seven days a week, making them business agents for their respective companies in a sense. (Mitchell, 2007) In this manual will provide you with some key concepts to help you for your new role as a supervisor. This manual will cover how to communicate, how to train new employees, improve on team productivity, conduct a performance appraisal, resolve conflict, and improve on employee relations. Demonstrating Communication Skills A new supervisor needs to know that communication is necessary to be able to lead your employees. Communication is one of the foundations of any organization and knowing how to communicate effectively will help your
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Best Practices Manual 3 organization thrive. Communication goes much further than verbal or written skills, although both are very important as a supervisor. Listening is another important skill in communicating. One of the biggest pitfalls that supervisors will fall into is listening to hearsay and allowing you to be caught up in the gossip. Written communication is used in many things we do, for instance, memos, emails, recommendations, or any work related problems, and employee appraisals (which will be discussed later on in this manual). When writing document it is crucial to proof read your document and check for any spelling or grammatically errors. The documents you write will be saved on file for future reference, so it is critical that it is written clearly and easy to read. Oral communication between the supervisor and the employee can help motivate the employee. It can explain to the employee how to do the job he or she is suppose to be doing, and listening to any questions or concerns the employee may have. One way of communicating is interpersonal communication. Interpersonal communication is an interactive process between individuals that involves sending and receiving verbal and nonverbal messages. (McGraw-Hill, 2004) Effective communication is a two way process that involves feed back. To develop good oral communication skills you should know the
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This note was uploaded on 05/10/2009 for the course MANAGEMENT 210 taught by Professor Jones during the Spring '09 term at University of Phoenix.

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MGT 210 Final - Best Practices Manual for Supervisors Lisa...

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